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17-stamp set to mark the 300th anniversary of the Romanov dynasty

In 1913, just four years before the abdication of Tsar Nicholas II, the Russian Empire issued a 17-stamp set to mark the 300th anniversary of the Romanov dynasty. Edward Klempka looks at the issued stamps, stationery and overprints with particular attention to their usage.

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Russia issued a series of stamps from 1 kopek to 5 roubles on 2 January 1913. This issue celebrated the 300th anniversary of the Romanov Tsars and Empresses who had ruled Russia. Nobody could have guessed that the country would soon thereafter become engulfed in World War I and the dynasty would shortly come to an end with the abdication of the Tsar Nicholas II in 1917. These events led to the Russian Civil War, the consequences of which are still with us today.

The stamps issued were pictorial, of high quality, which stood out as being exceptional, when compared with contemporary stamps. Postal stationery (newspaper wrappers, postcards, lettercards and envelopes) was also issued, incorporating the designs used to print the postage stamps.

Tsar Peter I

The 1k. brown-orange and 4k. carmine-red show the portrait of Tsar Peter I. He lived between 1672 and 1725 and is commonly referred to as ‘Peter the Great’. Born in Moscow on 9 June 1672, Peter was the 14th child of Tsar Alexis. He was the joint ruler with his brother Ivan V from 1682 and upon Ivan’s death in 1696 he was declared Tsar of all Russia. He created a strong navy, reorganised his army, secularised schools and introduced new administrative and territorial division of the country. He is best remembered for his extensive reforms which established Russia as one of the great nations.

The 1k. stamp was mainly used as a make-up value but served a postal purpose as being the tariff for local business card delivery and local newspapers and was issued in postage stamp and newspaper wrapper format . The 4k. carmine-red stamp paid the foreign postcard rate and was issued in both postage stamp and postcard formats.

Edward Klempka explores the whole set and explains their usage, in the November issue of Gibbons Stamp Monthly

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Commonwealth stamp of the week

Our Commonwealth specialists selection for the week:

This is in my opinion one of the most interesting & unusual items in stock at the moment. Not only is it incredibly rare, with less than 5 examples recorded, it’s also the only Commonwealth revenue to be adapted from a postage due. It’s unlikely you’ll get another opportunity to purchase for many years!
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Great Britain Stamp of the Week

Our Great Britain specialist selection for the week by Victoria Lajer:

“One of my favourite covers added to the Marketplace this month. The front bears a neatly cancelled 1d black Pl.7 and a beautiful engraved print of a local church. Illustrated covers are one of my favourite GB collecting areas but this one is particularly unusual.”

… [Read More] “Great Britain Stamp of the Week”

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Royal Mail and the Star Wars issue

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away (well, in an office at London’s Victoria Embankment) Royal Mail’s Stamps and Collectibles team came up with the idea to celebrate one of the biggest icons of the pop culture universe—Star Wars. On 20 October, almost two months before Star Wars: The Force Awakens, the seventh film in the saga, is released in the UK, Royal Mail will be issuing a 12-stamp set and an accompanying miniature sheet based on the characters and vehicles, new and old, from the Star Wars universe. … [Read More] “Royal Mail and the Star Wars issue”

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The British Post Office on Canton Island

The emergence of lucrative oceanic flights in the 1930s saw Canton Island, a tiny atoll located in the middle of the Paci­fic Ocean, serviced by two competing postal administrations; one from Britain and the other from the United States.

Canton_Island

Far out in the South Paci­fic, hundreds of miles from any neighbours (the Ellice Islands to the west, the Line Islands to the east), lies the Phoenix Islands— one of the loneliest groups of islands in the world. There are eight islands altogether, although some of them are small enough to be fractions of square kilometres. One, however, has become fairly well-known as an air destination, fishing spot and as an island where practicality took the place of governmental hubris. That atoll is Canton Island. … [Read More] “The British Post Office on Canton Island”

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