“Seahorse” High Value – Great Britain 1913

May 23, 2016 by Stanley Gibbons

Part of the Iconic Stamp series. Click here to see the full list of Iconic Stamps.

First issued in June and August 1913, on the cusp of World War 1, the definitive high value “Seahorses” remain one of the most iconic stamps to date. This is primarily due to their high quality engraving and intricate design, a depiction of Britannia on her chariot behind three horses on a rough sea, accompanied by a striking portrait of King George V. [Read more…]

Share this Post:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Collecting Stamps – the basics

May 17, 2016 by Stanley Gibbons
It seems reasonable to assume, since you are reading this, that you already collect British stamps – but of course there are many ways of building on any collection and if, you are relatively new to it, we hope that the following will be of some guidance. [Read more…]

Share this Post:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

5 Simple Steps to Starting a Stamp Collection

April 16, 2016 by Stanley Gibbons

STEP 1 – CHOOSING YOUR FIRST STAMPS

Starting a stamp collection is a lot of fun, learning all about the stamps which have been issued by the countries of the world over the years. The best advice to the novice is to buy the largest packet of whole-world stamps you can afford, together with a medium-priced album and some gummed stamp hinges to mount the stamps. This simple start will be your ‘apprenticeship’, and you will have the pleasure of sorting the stamps by country and arranging them in the album. You will be able to identify most of the stamps without hesitation: put aside any which you are doubtful about until you can trace them in the catalogue. To keep your interest alive, you will be seeking more and more stamps, and there are numerous sources of supply. [Read more…]

Share this Post:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

This month’s stamp lists

March 31, 2016 by Stanley Gibbons

A superb selection of our recent sales lists can be found here and unless already sold, all of these items are in the Stanley Gibbons online shop. Once you find your favourite item in the catalogues listed below, use the P code (e.g. P15607460) to search and buy it on the online shop or if you would like to discuss any of these items in further detail please contact one of the specialist team:

Ceylon List April 2016

Ceylon Commonwealth List

We have pleasure in presenting our current stock of Ceylon for your consideration. This deservedly popular country has always been one of our favourites, and this is the strongest and most interesting selection we have had for some time. The rather large ‘Stop Press’ section at the end must not be overlooked!

Great Britain List March 2016

Great Britain list

This month’s edition features a selection of quality pieces from our current stock. We have included a selection of items from across the entire GB collecting spectrum. We offer a broad range of material from Queen Victoria through to printing errors of Queen Elizabeth II, including several noteworthy examples of GB Departmental Officials. We also have a concise range our latest Booklets and Postal history including two attractive Channel Island covers and an interesting example of the 1929 PUC “First day” Presentation sheet.

Reflecting as many collecting interests and budget ranges as possible, we trust that there is something for everyone in this month’s Great Britain Brochure.

Share this Post:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Filed Under: Guides, no-follow

The £5 Orange Stamp that wasn’t needed

March 22, 2016 by Stanley Gibbons

Part of the Iconic Stamp series. Click here to see the full list of Iconic Stamps.

“For any serious GB collector who has passed the stage of having a Penny Black, it is likely to be their next dream or certainly amongst their foremost philatelic desires.” These were the closing words of Dr. John Horsey when he recently gave a presentation to the Royal Philatelic Society London, on a stamp that wasn’t actually needed for postal purposes – the £5 Orange.

There are some remarkable stamps out there; printed on wood, cork, plastic and even stamps made from foil! However, there is one special stamp that many GB collectors aspire to have – the £5 Orange. Along with the Penny Black, £1 Seahorse and £1 PUC, the £5 Orange is a stamp that is a true emblem of Great Britain philately. [Read more…]

Share this Post:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Stamp errors – If Variety is the Spice of Life: Try Adding it to Your Stamps

February 29, 2016 by Stanley Gibbons
Collecting stamps may be enjoyed in countless ways. Some of us save stamps from the whole World, others are more interested in a specific group of countries, or perhaps have just one favourite. You may like to collect only mint, or used, or both. Perhaps you favour a thematic approach, saving stamps featuring dogs, aeroplanes, waterfalls or some other subject that appeals to you, with no concern as to whether or not the stamps were issued for postal purposes or aimed primarily at the collector. [Read more…]

Share this Post:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

A guide to stamp condition and value: cancellation (part 5)

February 23, 2016 by Stanley Gibbons

Cancellation quality

When describing the postmarks of the nineteenth century, the word ‘obliteration’ is synonymous with ‘cancellation’ – because, of course, that was what they were designed to do – to ‘obliterate’ the stamp in such a way as to prevent any opportunity for reuse.

The Maltese cross is an attractive cancellation, especially when applied in red or one of the ‘fancy’ colours, but many early Great Britain line-engraved adhesives are heavily cancelled by over-inked black crosses, which detract considerably from the beauty of the stamps.

A ‘fine’ cancellation should be lightly applied, if possible leaving a substantial part of the design – ideally including the Queen’s profile – clear of the cancellation. Also desirable are well centred examples displaying all, or nearly all of the cancellation on the stamp.  This is particularly true where the cancellation is more significant than the stamp, such as a Wotton- under- Edge Maltese cross. Here, you would want to have as full a cancellation as possible, although it would still be preferable to have it lightly applied.

[Read more…]

Share this Post:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

A guide to stamp condition and value: damage and perfins (part 4)

February 22, 2016 by Stanley Gibbons

What’s the damage? 

We have looked at some aspects of damage in this series, notably in relation to perforations, so let us conclude by reviewing other aspects of damage.  All young collectors are advised from the outset to avoid torn stamps, and the advice obviously holds good throughout one’s philatelic life. However, that is not to say that all torn stamps are worthless, because even a torn example of a desirable stamp is still collectable and can therefore command a price. [Read more…]

Share this Post:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The 175th anniversary of the Penny Red

February 10, 2016 by Stanley Gibbons

Last year, the Penny Black celebrated its 175 years and this year, on the 10th of February, it was the Penny Red’s turn to celebrate its 175th anniversary. Whilst the Penny Black was initially a success it ultimately failed. Examples were reported with the red maltese cross cancellation removed and attempts made to re-use the stamps. Following some trials both the colour of the stamp and the cancellation were changed – the Penny Red was born. [Read more…]

Share this Post:
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail