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England - Charles I, Gold Triple Unite, minted Oxford during the Civil War, 1642

Stock code: CM000481X
£98,500
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Gold Pounds, Three (Triple Unite)
Date/mint mark: 1642
Type Oxford Mint, 'Declaration'
Ref. no: Schneider 286; N 2381; S 2724

Obv. Half length tall figure of Charles to left, wearing crown and full armour holding a sword and an olive branch. Plumes behind, 'CAROLVS DG MAG BRIT FRAN ET HI REX'. Rev. Declaration in a three line scroll, 'RELIG PROT / LEG ANG / LIBER PAR' (Protestant Religion, Laws of England, Liberty of Parliament), three plumes above with mark of value, date below; around 'EXVRGAT DEVS DISSIPENTVR INIMICI' (Let God arise and let the enemy be scattered).
46mm, 27g. GVF - Good Very Fine, strongly struck

TheTripleUnite, valued atsixty shillings, 60/-or three pounds, was the highestEnglishdenomination to be produced. It was struck at the Oxford Mint set up during the first English Civil War of 1642-6 and issued between January and March of 1642 at the hurriedly set up mint at New Inn Hall in Oxford. This huge coin was issued, at least in part, for use as gifts to those whom the King wished to 'cement' to his side in the Civil War. Thus he obverse design for the coin features an armoured bust of Charles I, with broadsword raised, and yet in visual dichotomy he bears an olive branch clutched over his heart. Charles was visually appealing to either nature of the benefactor he was seeking to entice. The bust on this coin is very hawkish which is the earliest type, later he had it changed to a more benevolent softer style. On the reverse he put his famous declaration – uttered in 1642 when he swore to to uphold the Protestant Religion, the laws of England and the freedom of Parliament. Very rare and spectacular coin!

Great Britain - 1739 AD Guineas, Two - (AEF) Milled, Gold

Stock code: CM000323X
£3,900
Country: Great Britain
King (reign): George II (1723 - 1760)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guineas, Two
Type: Milled Intermediate, laureate head
Ref. no: Schneider 576; S 3668

Obv. Laureate, draped bust left. Rev. Crowned, garnished Royal Arms – Great Britain, France, Ireland and Hanover.
32mm, 16.71g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, reverse better. Lustre in protected areas of the field, clean coin

Handsome large gold coin of George II, little wear making it a pleasing and desirable coin. George was the last British monarch born outside Great Britain and was born and brought up in Northern Germany. As king from 1727, George exercised little control over British domestic policy, which was largely controlled by Great Britain's parliament. As elector, he spent 12 summers in Hanover, where he had more direct control over government policy. He had a difficult relationship with his eldest son, Frederick , who supported the parliamentary opposition. During the War of the Austrian Succession, George participated at the Battle of Dettingen in 1743, and thus became the last British monarch to lead an army into battle. In 1745, supporters of the Stuart and Catholic claimant to the British throne failed to depose George in the last of the Jacobite rebellions. Frederick died unexpectedly in 1751, leaving George's grandson, George III , as heir apparent and ultimately king.

Yemen – Qasimid, gold Half Ryal 1959 of al-Nasir Ahmad.

Stock code: CM000412X
£2,875
Country: Yemen King (reign): Al-Nasir Ahmad (1948 - 1962)
Denomination/metal: Gold Ryal, Half
Type: Milled Mint of Dar al-Khilifa San'a'
Ref. no: KM YG16

Obv. Arabic legend within two crescents, two curved swords below Rev. Central roundel of Arabic legend, around legend and date.AH 1379h.
30mm, 17.94g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine.

"Very rare coin with little to no wear. Ahmad bin Yahya Hamidaddin was the penultimate king of the Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen from 1948 to 1962. Ahmad was considered to be a despot, and his main focus was on modernising the military.
In international politics, Ahmad forged many bonds with communist regimes, including the Soviet Union and China. He also joined the union between Egypt and Syria , but this would only last 3 years. Closer to home, he worked for the creation of Greater Yemen, which would have involved the anexation of the British Aden Protectorate.
In the 1920s and 1930s, as the effective crown prince (known as saif al-Islam, or Sword of Islam), Ahmad assisted his father by leading campaigns to suppress tribal revolts. Following the death of his father in a 1948 coup, Ahmad was able to regain power some months later. He was formally elected Imam of the Zeydi tribal leaders. The structures of the state gave him effectively supreme power in the country. In 1955 a coup by a group of officers and two of Ahmad's brothers was crushed. In April 1956 Ahmad bin Yahya signed a mutual defense pact with Egypt, involving a unified military command.
In September 1962 he died a natural death, and was briefly succeeded by his son Muhammad al-Badr. "

England, Charles II cast silver medal issued in 1660 to celebrate the ‘Restitution of the Monarchy’.

Stock code: CM000002X
£600
Country: England
Type: Cast
Ref. no: MI I 453/38; E215

Obv. Draped bust of Charles right Rev. Leafless tree bearing three crowns, under a radiant sun.
35mm, 7.73g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, good blue tone. Ornate suspension loop

Restoration medal by T. Rawlins. - To be worn by Royalist supporters on the return of the King. Leafless tree represents Royalty deprived of its honours which now with the restoration, will begin to flourish. RARE - USUALLY FOUND VERY WORN.

Philip & Mary silver shilling 1554. (Only English issue bearing Spanish king).

Stock code: CM000780
£5,500
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Philip and Mary (1554 - 1558)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: 1554
Type English Titles only.
Ref. no: S 2501; N 1968

Obv. Busts of Philip and Mary vis-a-vis, crown dividing date above, 'PHILIP ET MARIA D G REX ET REGINA ANGL'. Rev. Royal Arms with Spanish arms in first quarter, 'POSVIMUS DEVM ADJVTOREM NOSTRVM' (We have made God our helper).
31mm, 4.96g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, well struck and marvellously toned.

When Queen Mary married Philip II of Spain as consort he became king which meant technically he ruled England as the senior Royal (as a man). For nearly four years Philip was not only king of Spain but also king of England and with Mary he tried to bring the kingdom back into the Catholic fold - from which Mary's father, Henry VIII had 'wrenched' it. Struck for only two years this coin is not only rare but a tremendously interesting token of the religious struggle which was going on at this time. It is also a very good example as it is very difficult to find both portraits well struck up (often one is quite weak). Also all the peripheral legend on each side is clear and legible – again difficult to find and with seen little wear and with superb toning making this example an extremely desirable coin.

Scotland, Splendid gold Rider (100/- Scots) dated 1594.

Stock code: CM000779
£6,500
Country: Scotland
King (reign): James VI (1567 - 1625)
Denomination/metal: Gold Shillings, 100
Date/mint mark: 1594
Type Seventh issue.
Ref. no: S 5458

Obv. James, in full armour holding sword and orb, riding a fully caparisoned horse right, 'IACOBVS 6 D G R SCOTORVM'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms, 'SPERO MELIORA' ( I hope hope better things).
28mm, 4.96g. AVF - Almost Very Fine, well struck.

Very splendid Scottish coin, nicknamed the 'rider' this coin was worth 100 shillings Scots This coin was issued just before James became King of England and was brought south by James in 1603 and was made legal tender in England and Wales as 10 shillings. The coinage of James VI is a very large and varied issue – more so than any other Scottish monarch, many new and innovatively designed pieces were introduced during this reign as well as several new denominations. After he inherited the English throne as James I in 1603 the Scottish monetary system was tied to the English system at a rate of 12:1 which was continued until the union of the two crowns as the United Kingdom under Anne in 1707, at which point the Scottish coinage was called in.

England, Oliver Cromwell silver shilling (proposed !) dated 1658.

Stock code: CM001072
£4,250
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Oliver Cromwell (Lord Protector) (1653 - 1658)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: 1658
Type Proposed Milled Issue.
Ref. no: S 3228.

Obv. Laureate and draped bust left, with die flaw at late stage, legend and toothed border, OLIVAR D GR P ANG SCO HIB & PRO'. Rev. Crowned quartered shield of arms of the Protectorate, date
Above, toothed border 'PAX QVAERITVR BELLO'. (Peace is sought by war)
28mm, 6.08g. UC - Uncirculated, attractive grey toning with a little cabinet friction on highest points.

Superb condition and marvellous patination – would be pristine if not for the very slight cabinet friction on the highest points. Nevertheless, outstanding, desirable and rare. Made from Thomas Simon's coin mills, this series of some of the first machine made coins bearing Oliver Cromwell's portrait were made at the end of Cromwell's life. Authorised in 1656, they were issued in 1657 and 58, they are really patterns and did not generally circulate – however they are interesting in the respect that they indicate that the Lord Protector was 'assuming the purple' and may well have issued coins bearing his portrait with his crowned (!!!) arms had he not died !

England, Edward IV gold Ryal (10 shillings), light coinage, London mint, 1464 – 1470.

Stock code: CM001060
£4,750
Country: England, House of York
King (reign): Edward IV (1461 - 1470)
Denomination/metal: Gold Ryal
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Crown' on rev. only – 1465 – 70.
Type Second or 'Light coinage'.
Ref. no: Schneider 363v; N 1549 S 1950.

Obv. Crowned king in armour holding sword and Royal Arms within an antique ship with a rose in the middle and banner containing an 'E' on the stern, 'EDWARD DI GRA REX ANGL S FRANC DNS IB'. Rev. Cross 'fleurdelise' with crowned leopards in angles, rose on star in centre, all within tressure of eight arches, lis in outer angles, no mm; 'IHC AVT' TRANSIENS PER MEDIVM ILLORVM IBAT', (But Jesus, passing in the midst of them, went his way).
34mm, 7.59g. GVF - Good Extremely Fine, well and centrally struck on a small flan.

Attractive piece with details sharp and clear – especially king's facial features, details of the boat and intricate cross on the other side. Issued in the middle of the wars of the Roses, a very turbulent time of civil war in England. Edward was an extremely capable and daring military commander and destroyed the House of Lancaster in a series of spectacular military victories - he was never defeated on the field of battle. Despite his occasional (if serious) political setbacks — usually at the hands of his great Machiavellian rival, Louis XI of France ! Edward was a popular and very able king. While he lacked foresight and was at times cursed by bad judgement, he possessed an uncanny understanding of his most useful subjects, and the vast majority of those who served him remained unwaveringly loyal until his death.

England, Elizabeth I gold Pound issued 1594 – 1596. Outstanding example.

Stock code: CM001058
£28,500
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603)
Denomination/metal: Gold Pound
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Woolpack' – May 1594 – Feb. 1596.
Type Third Issue, Crown Coinage.
Ref. no: Schneider 799; N 2008; S 2534.

Obv. Crowned bust left with long hair and intricate bodice, 'ELIZABETH DG ANG' FRA' ET HI' REGINA'. Rev. Crowned and garnished Royal Arms dividing 'ER', SCVTAM FIDEI PROTERET EAM', (The shield of faith shall protect her).
39mm, 11.22g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, well and centrally struck

Superb and outstanding example of a rare coin in a condition almost impossible to better. This rare and large gold coin represents in every way 'Elizabeth Gloriana'. The die work is very good resulting in a marvellous and attractive detail to Elizabeth's portrait – the clarity of her features, the intricacy of her bodice and with no wear, all in sharp definition. This is a gem of a coin and a fantastic contemporary portrait of this iconic Tudor queen.

Gt. Britain, Anne gold Guinea 1714.

Stock code: CM001082
£2,950
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Anne (1702 - 1714)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guinea
Date/mint mark: 1714
Type Post Union Issue.
Ref. no: S 3574.

Obv. Draped bust left, lovelock over right shoulder, 'ANNA DEI GRATIA'. Rev. Royal Arms in cruciform, sceptres in angles, garter star in centre, 'MAG BRI FR ET HIB REG'.
25mm, 8.35g. AEF - About Extremly Fine, rev. Good Extremely Fine.

Good condition piece – traces of original lustre particularly on reverse.

Roman Republic, C. Considius Nonianus silver Denarius 57 BC, (Temple of Venus Erycina)

Stock code: CM001088
£1,150
Country: Roman
King (reign): C. Considius Nonianus
Denomination/metal: Silver Denarius
Date/mint mark: 57 BC
Type Rome Mint
Ref. no: Craw 424/1; Syd 887; RCV 381.

Obv. Laureate, diademed and draped bust of Venus right, 'C . CONSIDI . NONIANI (SC)'. Rev. Temple of Venus Erycina on a rocky mound within a gated wall, 'ERVC' on mound
18mm, 4.11g. EF - Extremely Fine and attractively toned. Obv. struck off centre.

Very attractive Roman Republican denarius and rare in this condition. The obverse is off-centre but as the only missing legend is 'SC' it really does not detract at all. The reverse was traditionally identified with the sanctuary of Venus at Eryx in Sicily but it is now thought to represent its counterpart near the Colline Gate where Sulla took control of Rome in 82 BC, in which case the walls are those of Rome.

England, Henry VI gold Quarter-Noble issued London 1422 – 1430.

Stock code: CM001080
£850
Country: England
King (reign): Henry VI (1422 - 1461)
Denomination/metal: Gold Noble, Quarter
Date/mint mark: 1422 – 30
Type London Mint, Annulet Issue.
Ref. no: Schneider 295; N 1420; S 1810.

Obv. Royal Arms in a tressure of eight arches, 'HENRIC' DI' GRA' REX ANGL'. Rev. Cross fleuree with lis in centre and crowned lions 'passant guardant' in angles, annulet in first spandrel, mullet after 'EXALTIBVR IN GLORIA', (He shall be exalted in glory).
20mm, 1.65g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck.

Well struck on a large flan with little wear – Very nice example. Henry was a child of only nine months when he came to the throne,thus making him the youngest person ever to succeed to the English throne. Two months later, on 21 October 1422, he became King of France upon his grandfather Charles VI's death in agreement with the terms of the Treaty of Troyes in 1420. His mother, Catherine of Valois, was then 20 years old and, as Charles VI's daughter, was viewed with considerable suspicion ! His father's brothers were appointed regents until he came of age and this particular coin was struck under the regency of John Duke of Bedford.

England, Charles I silver hammered Shilling issued between 1636 and 1638.

Stock code: CM001077
£525
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Tun' – 1636 – 38.
Type Tower Mint, Group 'D', Type 3a.
Ref. no: S 2791.

Obv. Crowned, draped bust left, denomination behind, 'CAROLVS D G MA BR FR ET HI REX'. Rev. Oval, garnished Royal Arms, 'CHRISTO AVSPICE REGNO', (I reign under the auspice of Christ).
29mm, 6.07g. VF - Very Fine or better – well struck. No weak areas, lightly toned.

Not rare (as Charles shillings go) but beautiful condition – well struck with all details and legend crisp and clear. At this period hammered coin production did not have very good quality control apart from getting the weight right, but in this piece we see a carefully struck coin with complete legend both sides, good facial features, clear Royal Arms. In short a desirable and uncommon piece.

Brunswick-Wolfenbuttel, Rudolph-August silver Three Thalers 1685, Lauthenthal Mines Issue,

Stock code: CM001086
£4,500
Country: (Germany) Brunswick-Wolfenbuttel
King (reign): Rudolph-August, 1666 – 1685
Denomination/metal: Silver Thalers, Three (Loeser)
Date/mint mark: 1685
Type Lauthenthal Mines issue (Zellerfeld)
Ref. no: Dav (LS) 111; Welter 1834; Duve 3.

Obv. Brunswick Arms with multiple quartering s and ornate crests, 'D G RUDOLPH AUGUSTUS DUX BRUNS ET LUN', (By the Grace of God, Rudolph-Augustus, duke of Brunswick and Luneburg) Small '3' contermark in foliage to left of arms, 'RB' mintmasters initials. Rev. Fortune playing a lute and equipped with a sail proceeds slowly to the left on a snail, 'TU TANDEM ABIECTAM REDDES DEUS ALME SONORAM', (You, Merciful God will finally restore the last sound).
75mm, 76.45g. GVF - Good Very Fine. Lightly toned.

Spectacular German three thaler piece (minted to this size and countermarked with a small '3' to the left of the arms. Lauthenthal, a town in the Harz Mountains of modern central Germany, was the site of a famous silver mine called “Lauthenthal’s Luck.” The town was founded in 1538 when iron ore was discovered in the area. After further exploration, the town developed into a successful silver mining operation. These multiple thalers, which depict Lauthenthal and its mine works in careful detail, reveal the mine’s importance to the dukes of Brunswick as a source of great wealth. The young woman on the reverse, standing before a mountain mining scene, is an allegorical depiction of the goddess Fortuna. She plays a lute (“Laute” in German) in her role as the personification of the town of Lauthenthal. The dukes of Brunswick minted these large coins to serve as an overflow fund when Lauthenthal’s rate of production was very high. Landowners in the duchy were required to purchase the thalers according to their means. If the duke needed funding for a war or other emergency, he could ask for the coins to be returned. In exchange, the landowners would receive coins of lower silver purity.

England, Elizabeth I silver One Testern (1600) – proposed for use in East Indies.

Stock code: CM001069
£4,800
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603)
Denomination/metal: Silver Testern, One
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'O' – 1600 – 01.
Type Portcullis Money
Ref. no: N -; S 2607d.

Obv. Crowned Royal Arms dividing crowned 'ER', 'ELIZABETH D G AN FR ET HI REGINA'. Rev. Crowned Portcullis, 'POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM', (I have made God my helper).
24mm, 3.17g. GVF - Good Very Fine, toned, signs of former crease.

Exceptionally rare and well struck exhibiting little wear and signs of a a small crease. Very important historically - the few known are extraordinarily badly struck and this example shows a good clear portcullis with most of the legend visible. This Portcullis money of One Testern (or 1/8th.dollar) was struck at the Tower Mint for the use of the Company of Merchants of London, later to be the East India Company and were taken on their first voyage to the East. They are considered by many to be our first purely colonial issue. They were produced with the intention to compete with the Spanish ""pieces of eight” which was the accepted currency in the East. Like the Spanish coins they were hoping to replace, they were issued in denominations of one, two, four and eight testerns and their purpose was to consolidate Britain's influence in the economic and commercial struggle with other 'would be' colonisers such as the Spanish and Dutch. Unfortunately, the coins were not a success as they were not popular with traders in the East, who were suspicious of these new strange looking coins – preferring the accepted then established Spanish 'coins of trade'. There are only thought to be less than two hundred surviving coins (of all four denoms.) of which many are in museums.

England, Elizabeth I silver 'milled' Halfcrown of 1601

Stock code: CM001068
£6,300
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown, Half
Date/mint mark: Mintmark '1' – 1601
Type Seventh issue.
Ref. no: N 2013; S 2583.

Obv. Crowned bust left with intricate bodice, 'ELIZABETH D G ANG FRA ET HIBER REGINA'. Rev. Royal Arms on cross fourchee, 'POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM', (I have made God my helper)
35mm, 14.9g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, reverse better.

This coin is well struck and very nicely patinated , especially on the reverse. The die work is very good and with this strong strike has resulted in marvellous and attractive detail to Elizabeth's portrait – the clarity of her features, the intricacy of her bodice and with little wear, all in sharp definition. This is a very good example and a fantastic contemporary portrait of this iconic Tudor queen.

England, Philip & Mary silver Shilling 1554, very good condition !

Stock code: CM001089
£2,250
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Philip and Mary (1554 - 1558)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: 1554
Type Dated, Full Titles
Ref. no: N 1967; S 2500.

Obv. Large crown over busts of Philip and Mary vis a vis, date. 'PHILIP ET MARIA D G R ANG FR NEAP PR HISP'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms of Spain and England. Denomination (XII) by crown, 'POSVIMVS DEVM ADIVTOREM NOSTRVM', (We have made god our helper).
30mm, 5.93g. GVF - Good Very Fine, pretty good strike.

Although it has seen a little wear, this coin is a very good specimen as both portraits of Philip and Mary are well struck up (often one is quite weak) and sharply clear regarding the details of their facial features and dress. Also all the peripheral legend on each side is mostly clear and legible – again difficult to find and with the fact that this piece is also very attractively patinated makes it a very desirable and exceptional. When Queen Mary married Philip II of Spain as consort he became king which meant technically he ruled England as the senior Royal (as a man). For nearly four years Philip was not only king of Spain and Naples but also king of England and with Mary he tried to bring the kingdom back into the Catholic fold - from which Mary's father, Henry VIII had 'wrenched' it. Struck for only two years this coin is not only rare but a tremendously interesting token of the religious struggle which was going on at this time.

England, Elizabeth I large gold Sovereign (30 shillings) issued 1592 – 1593. Attractive example.

Stock code: CM001059
£16,750
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603)
Denomination/metal: Gold Sovereign
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Tun' – Feb. 1592 – Jun. 1593.
Type Second issue, Second period.
Ref. no: Schneider 783; N 2003 S 2529.

Obv. Elizabeth, crowned and wearing ceremonial robes, seated facing on throne bearing orb and sceptre, portcullis at her feet, 'ELIZABETH D'G' ANG' FRA' ET HIB' REGINA'. Rev. Royal Arms in centre of Tudor rose, 'A DNO FACTV' EST ISTVDET EST MIRAB' INOCVL' NRS', (This is the Lord's doing and is marvellous in our eyes'.
42mm, 15.32g. GVF - Good Very Fine, a little weak to the right of her chin. Small privy mark (cross) lightly scratched on her right shoulder).

Large, splendid and rare gold Thirty shillings piece of Elizabeth, called a sovereign because it portrays the sovereign in full length. Very good condition although just al little weakly struck at Elizabeth's chin – if it were strong here then the coin would be two to three times this price. Apart from this natural striking weakness it is a very good coin and the detail on the reverse is very crisp and strong.

England, James I gold Unite (20 shillings) issued 1604 – 1605.

Stock code: CM001061
£3,250
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): James VI (1567 - 1625)
Denomination/metal: Gold Shillings, Twenty (Unite)
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Lis' – Nov. 1604 – Jun. 1605.
Type Second Issue.

Obv. Crowned king in full armour right holding orb and sceptre, IACOBVS DG MAG BRIT FRANC ET HIB REX'. Rev. Crowned and garnished Royal Arms dividing 'IR', FACIAM EOS IN GENTEM VNAM'. (I will make them into one nation).
37mm, 9.84g. AVF - About Very Fine, well struck but with a little wear.

Although this coin has seen a little wear, because it was strongly stuck all the main features are still visible and it is still a very attractive piece of this first Stuart monarch of England. Called a 'Unite' because of James's wish to 'unite' the nations of England and Scotland – which sentiment he chose to be the reverse legend of his twenty Shillings piece. This is a concept that is particularly relevant today !

Brabant, Jeanne & Wenceslas gold 'Pieter d'Or' struck at Louvain c 1370.

Stock code: CM001083
£2,900
Country: Brabant King (reign): Jeanne & Wenceslas, 1355 – 1383
Denomination/metal: Gold Pieter d'Or
Date/mint mark: c. 1355 – 83.
Type Louvain Mint
Ref. no: Delm 45; F 11.

Obv. St. Peter, holding key and bible, above quartered arms of Bohemia, Brabant, Limburg and Luxembourg, 'WENCELAUS Z IOhANA DEI GRA BRAB DUCES', (Wenceslas and Jeanne, by the grace of God, duke and duchess of Brabant). Rev. Cross fleuree with a rose in the centre, 'XPC VINCIT XPC REGNAT XPC IMPERAT', (Christ conquers, Christ rules, Christ commands)
27mm, 4.1g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, well struck

Very beautiful well preserved gold coin issued at Louvain by the Duke and Duchess of Brabant. Joanna, Duchess of Brabant (24 June 1322 – 1 November 1406), granddaughter of Edward I of England, also known as Jeanne, was the heiress of Duke John III, who died in Brussels, December 5, 1355. Her second marriage was to Wenceslaus of Luxemburg. The famous document, the foundation of the rule of law in Brabant called the Blijde Inkomst ("Joyous Entry"), was arrived at in January 1356, in order to assure Joanna and her consort peaceable entry into their capital and to settle the inheritance of the Duchy of Brabant on her "natural heirs", who were Joanna's sisters, they being more acceptable to the burghers of Brabant than rule by the House of Luxembourg. The document was seen as a dead letter, followed by a military incursion in 1356 into Brabant by Louis II of Flanders, who had married Margaret, Joanna's younger sister, and considered himself Duke of Brabant by right of his wife. With the Duchy overrun by Louis' forces, Joanna and Wencelaus signed the humiliating Treaty of Ath, which ceded Malines and Antwerp to Louis. By August 1356 Joanna and Wencelaus had called upon the Emperor, Charles IV to support them by force of arms. Charles met at Maastricht with the parties concerned, including representatives of the towns, and all agreed to nullify certain terms of the Blijde Inkomst, to satisfy the Luxembourg dynasty.The duchy continued to deteriorate with Wencelaus' defeat and captured at the battle of Baesweiler in 1371

South Africa, Late Boer Issue, gold 'Veld Pond' 1902, very rare !

Stock code: CM001093
£9,000
Country: South Africa
King (reign): Schalk Burger, 1900 – 1902
Denomination/metal: Gold Pond
Date/mint mark: 1902
Type Emergency Issue.
Ref. no: Hern Z 54; KM 11; F4.

Obv. 'ZAR' (Zuid Afrikaansche Republiek) 1902 Rev. 'EEN POND' (One pound).
23mm, 8.65g. GVF - Good Very Fine, struck slightly off centre and possibly lightly cleaned in the past.

Very Rare and in good condition. During the Anglo-Boer war there was a shortage of coins for provisions for the Boer troops. Consequently, a Mint was established in the field/veld at 'Pilgrims Rest' now known as Mpumalanga. A 29 year old former school teacher, Mr PJ Kloppers, was appointed as the Head of the Mint. A hand press was improvised and discs of 24 carat gold were manufactured. Remarkably, these coins were struck with only one pair of dies and a lathe turned by two men. These coins are classified as ‘Siege Pieces’ or ‘Money of Necessity’ Soft hand-cut dies and an improvised flypress were used to strike about 530 coins in gold with an intrinsic value of 22 shillings ie a bit more than a sovereign. Only a single set of hand carved dies were used - thus the simple design and the poor quality of the resulting letters on the coin minted. Hundreds were badly struck and melted down afresh, but all in all, the process was a success. The assayer of the Veld Pond Mint, a Mr. M. Cooney, wrote to a member of his family discussing the gold coin. In the letter Cooney says that just 530 coins were struck. The commonly accepted number was nearly double this at 986. Important validation of the new figure of the mintage of just 530 Veldpondës has now been received from the well respected researcher Dr Rentia Landman. Certainly, just over two hundred only are now known to exist which possibly supports this lower mintage figure.

England, Henry VI gold Half-Noble issued London 1422 – 1430.

Stock code: CM001079
£2,800
Country: England
King (reign): Henry VI (1422 - 1461)
Denomination/metal: Gold Noble, Half
Date/mint mark: Annulet by arm 1422- 30.
Type London Mint, Annulet Issue.
Ref. no: N 1417; S 1805.

Obv. King in ship holding shield of Royal Arms and sword, annulet by sword arm, lis after name, trefoil stops, 'HENRIC' DI' GRA' REX ANGL' Z FRAN h'. Rev. Cross fleuree with 'h' in centre and crowned lions 'passant guardant' in angles, annulet in first spandrel, mullet after 'DOMINE NE IN FVRORE TVO ARGVAS ME', (Oh Lord rebuke me not in Thy anger).
25mm, 3.48g. GVF - Good Very Fine, rev. a little weakly struck.

Although the reverse is a little weak the obverse is strong and has seen no wear and is a splendid representation of a medieval king and English sea-power and a beautiful early fifteenth century work of art ! Henry was a child of only nine months when he came to the throne,thus making him the youngest person ever to succeed to the English throne. Two months later, on 21 October 1422, he became King of France upon his grandfather Charles VI's death in agreement with the terms of the Treaty of Troyes in 1420. His mother, Catherine of Valois, was then 20 years old and, as Charles VI's daughter, was viewed with considerable suspicion ! His father's brothers were appointed regents until he came of age and this particular coin was struck under the regency of John Duke of Bedford.

England, Charles I silver Crown, struck during Civil War at Truro 1642 – 1643.

Stock code: CM001063
£1,500
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Rose' – 1642-43.
Type Truro Mint
Ref. no: S 3045.

Obv. King crowned and armoured on horse left, sash flying out, 'CAROLVS D G MAG BRIT FRA ET HI REX'. Rev. Round, garnished Royal Arms, CHRISTO AVSPICE REGNO' (I reign under the auspice of Christ).
42mm, 28.82g. VF - Very Fine, upper bust a little weakly struck

These coins are normally quickly and badly struck but this example exhibits very little wear, a full legend with a very well struck reverse. However the upper bust of Charles is a little weak but the detail in the horse is very good. This coin is a better specimen than the plate coin in 'Coins of England'. When the Civil War began in 1642, the Tower mint fell into the hands of Parliament and Charles was forced to open a mints in Royalist held western England at Shrewsbury, Bristol and Oxford Truro and finally Exeter. (1642 -46). In 1643 the king was already minting coins in Truro and on 4 September, after a siege, Exeter surrendered to Prince Maurice and the city remained in Royalist hands till 9 April 1646. On 3 January 1644 Sir Richard Vyvyan received a Royal Commission to set up a mint in Exeter;

Brabant, Jeanne & Wenceslas gold 'Pieter d'Or' struck at Louvain c 1370.

Stock code: CM001084
£2,350
Country: Belgium King (reign): Jeanne & Wenceslas, 1355 – 1383
Denomination/metal: Gold Pieter d'Or
Date/mint mark: c. 1355 – 83.
Type Louvain Mint
Ref. no: Delm 45; F 11.

Obv. St. Peter, holding key and bible, above quartered arms of Bohemia, Brabant, Limburg and Luxembourg , 'WENCELAUS Z IohANA DEI GRA BRAB DUCES', (Wenceslas and Jeanne, by the grace of God, duke and duchess of Brabant). Rev. Cross fleuree with a rose in the centre, 'XPC VINCIT XPC REGNAT XPC IMPERAT', (Christ conquers, Christ rules, Christ commands)
26mm, 4.1g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, obv. Legend a little weakly struck to right

Very beautiful well preserved gold coin issued at Louvain by the Duke and Duchess of Brabant a little weakly struck on obverse right. Joanna, Duchess of Brabant (24 June 1322 – 1 November 1406), granddaughter of Edward I of England, also known as Jeanne, was the heiress of Duke John III, who died in Brussels, December 5, 1355. Her second marriage was to Wenceslaus of Luxemburg. The famous document, the foundation of the rule of law in Brabant called the Blijde Inkomst ("Joyous Entry"), was arrived at in January 1356, in order to assure Joanna and her consort peaceable entry into their capital and to settle the inheritance of the Duchy of Brabant on her "natural heirs", who were Joanna's sisters, they being more acceptable to the burghers of Brabant than rule by the House of Luxembourg. The document was seen as a dead letter, followed by a military incursion in 1356 into Brabant by Louis II of Flanders, who had married Margaret, Joanna's younger sister, and considered himself Duke of Brabant by right of his wife. With the Duchy overrun by Louis' forces, Joanna and Wencelaus signed the humiliating Treaty of Ath, which ceded Malines and Antwerp to Louis. By August 1356 Joanna and Wencelaus had called upon the Emperor, Charles IV to support them by force of arms. Charles met at Maastricht with the parties concerned, including representatives of the towns, and all agreed to nullify certain terms of the Blijde Inkomst, to satisfy the Luxembourg dynasty.The duchy continued to deteriorate with Wencelaus' defeat and captured at the battle of Baesweiler in 1371

Gt. Britain, Anne gold Five-Guinea 1706.

Stock code: CM001081
£16,750
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Anne (1702 - 1714)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guineas, Five
Date/mint mark: 1706 QVINTO
Type Post Union Issue.
Ref. no: S 3566.

Obv. Draped bust left, lovelock over right shoulder, 'ANNA DEI GRATIA'. Rev. Royal Arms in cruciform, sceptres in angles, garter star in centre, 'MAG BRI FR ET HIB REG'.
38mm, 41.69g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, surface marks.

Large, splendid and attractive coin – first Five-Guineas to be struck after the Act of Union . The Union of English and Scottish Parliaments actually took place on the 1st. of May 1707 – however, it had been agreed by both parliaments in July 1706 so this coin jumps the gun a little by combining the arms of England and Scotland for this date !

England, Edward III, gold Half-Noble, Treaty period – 1361 - 69

Stock code: CM001092
£2,350
Country: England
King (reign): Edward III (1327 - 1377)
Denomination/metal: Gold Noble, Half
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Cross potent' : 1361 -69.
Type Treaty Period
Ref. no: Schneider 79/80; N 1238; S 1506.

Obv. King standing in ship holding sword and shield, ship rigging with three ropes to left, and
two to right, ornaments on top line of hull, saltire stops both sides, annulet before legend, no French title, second A of legend barred, 'ED WARDx
DEIx GRAx REXx AnGLx DnS hyB xZx AQ T', (with Aquitaine title) Rev. Cross fleuree with 'h' in centre and crowned lions 'passant guardant' in angles, 'DOMINE NE IN FVRORE TVO ARGVAS ME', (Oh Lord rebuke me not in Thy anger).
27mm, 3.63g. F - Very Fine or better, Full flan and wel struck.

Very attractive and quintessential medieval coin – has seen some wear but is well struck with all legend visible either side. There is an interesting aspect to this coin for unlike most other English coins of the period, Edward has dropped his claim to France in the obverse legend. This is because after negotiations with France for peace which led to the Treaty of Bretigni in 1360, and anxious to keep the negotiated trading going between the two countries, Edward dropped this claim lest it upset the French. However, after ten years, in 1370. he resumed his claim and France is proclaimed as his on subsequent English coins for more than three centuries to come !

England, Philip & Mary silver Sixpence 1554

Stock code: CM001073
£2,200
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Philip and Mary (1554 - 1558)
Denomination/metal: Silver Penny, Six (Sixpence)
Date/mint mark: 1554
Type Dated, Full Titles
Ref. no: N 1970. S 2505.

Obv. Large crown over busts of Philip and Mary vis a vis, date. 'PHILIP ET MARIA D G R ANG FR NEAP PR HISP'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms of Spain and England. Denomination (VI) by crown, 'POSVIMVS DEVM ADIVTOREM NOSTRVM', (We have made god our helper).
26mm, 2.99g. GVF - Good Very Fine, Philip's shoulder a little weak, attractively patinated

This coin is a very good specimen as both portraits of Philip and Mary are well struck up although Philip's shoulder and beard could be a little stronger. Also all the peripheral legend on each side is generally clear and legible – again difficult to find and with the fact that this piece has seen little wear and is also very attractively patinated makes this example very desirable. When Queen Mary married Philip II of Spain as consort he became king which meant technically he ruled England as the senior Royal (as a man). For nearly four years Philip was not only king of Spain and Naples but also king of England and with Mary he tried to bring the kingdom back into the Catholic fold - from which Mary's father, Henry VIII had 'wrenched' it. Struck for only two years this coin is not only rare but a tremendously interesting token of the religious struggle which was going on at this time.

England, Henry VI gold Noble issued London 1422 – 1430

Stock code: CM001091
£5,000
Country: England
King (reign): Henry VI (1422 - 1461)
Denomination/metal: Gold Noble
Date/mint mark: Annulet by right arm 1422- 30.
Type London Mint, Annulet Issue.
Ref. no: Schneider 274; N 1414; S 1799.

Obv. King in ship holding shield of Royal Arms and sword, annulet by sword arm, lis after name, trefoil stops, 'HENRIC' DI' GRA' REX ANGL' Z FRANC' DNS HYB'. Rev. Cross 'fleurdelise' with crowned leopards in angles, 'h' in centre, all within tressure of eight arches, lis in outer angles annulets in legend of rev. , 'IhC AVT TRANSIENS PER MEDIVM ILLORVM IBAT' (But Jesus, passing through the midst of them, went on his way).
34mm, 6.96g. AEF - About Extremely Fine, well struck on a large flan.

Particularly good specimen, well struck and beautifully crisp and clear and is thus so rare and a fantastic early fifteenth century work of art ! Pretty coin ! Henry was a child of only nine months when he came to the throne, thus making him the youngest person ever to succeed to the English throne. Two months later, on 21 October 1422, he became King of France upon his grandfather Charles VI's death in agreement with the Treaty of Troyes in 1420. His mother, Catherine of Valois, was then 20 years old and, as Charles VI's daughter, was viewed with considerable suspicion ! His father's brothers were appointed regents until he came of age and this particular coin was struck under the regency of John Duke of Bedford.

Scotland, James VI silver 'Balance' Half-Merk of 1591.

Stock code: CM001070
£1,000
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): James VI (1567 - 1625)
Denomination/metal: Silver Merk, Half
Date/mint mark: 1591
Type Sixth Coinage.
Ref. no: S 5491.

Obv. Crowned shield between two thistles, 'IACOBVS 6 D G R SCOT0RVM'. Rev. Pair of scales with sword behind, 'HIS DIFFERT REGE TYRANNVS', (In these a tyrant differs from a king).
30mm, 4.42g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck and nicely toned.

Well struck and attractively patinated. The coin was worth six shillings and eight pence Scots – the coins of James VI's reign are considered to have the most beautiful designs and most varied legends of all Scottish coins. After the Union of the Crowns of 1603, Scottish gold and silver coins closely resembled their English counterparts.

Princely State of Hyderabad, Afzal ad-Daula gold Mohur dated 1285h (1869), mint of Hyderabad.

Stock code: CM001044
£625
Country: India, Princely State of Hyderabad
King (reign): Afzal ad-Daula, 1857 – 1869
Denomination/metal: Gold Mohur
Date/mint mark: 1285h (1869).
Type Hyderabad Mint
Ref. no: KM Y-11.

Obv. Persian script – Rulers title and date. Rev. Persian script - mint epithet.
20mm, 11.11g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, well struck with crisp definition. Small square test punch on rev.

Superb condition coin with crisply clear ruler's name, date and mint epithet – small square test punch on reverse. Afzal ad-Daula's realm was divided into five 'subahs' and sixteen districts; each subah was headed by a Subedar and each district by a Taluqdar. Reforms during his reign, by his Prime Minister Salar Jung, included the establishment of a governmental central treasury in 1855. He also reformed the Hyderabad revenue and judicial systems, instituted a postal service and constructed the first rail and telegraph networks. In 1861 he was awarded the Star of India.

Liechtenstein, Johann II silver Vereinsthaler 1862, Very rare.

Stock code: CM001020
£2,450
Country: Liechtenstein
King (reign): Johann II, 1858 – 1929
Denomination/metal: Silver Francs, 100
Date/mint mark: 1862
Type Vienna Mint
Ref. no: HMZ 2. 1373; KM 1.

Obv. Bare head lright, 'JOHANN II FURST ZU LIECHTENSTEIN'. Rev. Arms of principality in heavily draped shield, 'EIN VEREINSTHALER ZU XXX EIN PFUND FEIN' (One Vereinsthaler, 30 to the pound [fine-silver]).
33mm, 18.51g. UC - Uncirculated - proof-like, bright with very good fields.

Very rare coin – mintage of only 1,920. Also superb condition with an almost 'proof' look which indicates it is an early strike.

England, Charles II silver Shilling 1663.

Stock code: CM001105
£1,800
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles II (1660 - 1685)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: 1663
Type First Bust
Ref. no: ESC 1022; S 3371.

Obv. Laurete, draped bust of Charles right, 'CAROLVS II DEI GRATIA'. Rev. Cruciform Royal Arms with entwined 'C's in angles and Garter Cross in centre, 'MAG BR FRA ET HIB REX'.
25mm, 6.02g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, attractive toning with traces of original lustre, small edge nick on rev. rim.

Very pretty example – attractively toned, with considerable original lustre

Sultanate of Gujarat, Nasir al-Din Mahmud Shah III gold tanka dated 951h (1543).

Stock code: CM001028
£750
Country: India, Sultanate of Gujarat
King (reign): Nasir al-Din Mahmud Shah III, 1537 – 1553
Denomination/metal: Gold Tanka
Date/mint mark: 951h (1543).
Type No Mint
Ref. no: G&G G412.

Obv. Persian script 'Wathiq'. Rev. Persian script (his name) in square body,date within legend.
18mm, 11.79g. EF - Good Extremely Fine, well struck.

Very attractive coin in such good condition, beautiful clear date and good form – an outstanding example. At the end of the reign of Nasir al-Din Mahmud Shah III in 961 H (1553 AD) he punished one of his attendants, Burhan al-Din, for disrespectful behaviour, but Burhan retaliated by assassinating the sultan and a number of his nobles, and seized the throne for himself !

Italy, Vittorio Emanuele II large gold 100 lira piece 1864, Torino. Excesively rare – only 579 struck!

Stock code: CM001018
£17,500
Country: Italy
King (reign): Vittorio Emanuele II, 1861 – 1878
Denomination/metal: Gold Lira, 100
Date/mint mark: 1864
Type Torino Mint issue
Ref. no: Mont 126; Pag 451; F 8.

Obv. Bare head left, VITTORIO EMANUELE II'. Rev. Crowned arms in laurel wreath, 'REGNO D'ITALIA'.
34mm, 32.22g. EF - Extremely Fine, bright (old cleaning) with normal bag marks.

The brightness of this coin indicates it may have been lightly cleaned in antiquity. However, it is excessively rare with a mintage of only 579 pieces !!! It is large and iconic – the largest coin issued by Vittorio Emanuele II and consequently, much sort after. Even taking into account its brightness it is still very desirable and very rarely comes onto the market. It is one of the key coins of the Italian milled series – a very popular area.

Scotland, James VI silver Ten shillings 1582.

Stock code: CM001101
£5,000
Country: Scotland King (reign): James VI (1567 - 1625)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shillings, Ten
Date/mint mark: 1582
Type Fourth Coinage
Ref. no: S 5490.

Obv. Crowned half bust of James left, holding sword in right hand, 'IACOBVS 6 DEI GRATIA REX SCOTORVM'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms dividing 'IR' and denomination 'X S', 'HONOR REGIS IVDICIVM DILIGIT', (The king's power loveth judgement).
31mm, 7.79g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck and nicely toned.

Outstanding ten shillings of this young Scottish king – beautiful detail in facial features and bust. Rare, spectacular with a very good provenances (Dakers, Langford and Hird collections) - thus desirable and much rarer than the larger 30 shillings piece ! King of Scotland from 1567 as a one year old and England (as James I) from 1603. The son of Mary Queen of Scots and her second husband, Lord Darnley, he succeeded to the Scottish throne on the enforced abdication of his mother and assumed power in 1583, and this coin was issued just before his majority when he was only seventeen. James's childhood and adolescence were unhappy, abnormal, and precarious; he had various guardians, whose treatment of him differed widely. His education, although thorough, was weighted with Presbyterian and Calvinist political doctrine, and his character – highly intelligent and sensitive, but also fundamentally shallow, vain, and exhibitionist – reacted violently to this. However, initially he established a strong centralized authority, and in 1589 married Anne of Denmark.

Scotland, Charles I silver twelve-shillings, Intermediate Issue 1637 – 1642.

Stock code: CM001103
£375
Country: Scotland King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shillings, Twelve
Type Third Coinage, Intermediate Issue
Ref. no: S 5559.

Obv. Crowned bust left, denomination 'XII' behind, CAR D G MAG BRITAN FR ET HIB REX'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms dividing crowned 'CR', small thistle above crown, QVE DEVS CONIVNXIT NEMO SEPARET' (What God hath joined together let no man put asunder).
31mm, 5.81g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck, weight adjustment marks.

Beautifully detailed bust and good example of this 'Intermediate' issue of superior coins issued while Nicholas Briot was working at the Edinburgh Mint. Charles I had sent the French die engraver up to Edinburgh to sort the coinage out in 1635 as 'Master of the Scottish Mint' and a few years later he was joined by his son-in-law John Falconer who eventually succeeded him in 1646. However, this series of coins was engraved either by Briot or Falconer under his father-in-law's direction, in the early years of 1637 – 1642.

Sultanate of Gujarat, Nasir al-Din Mahmud Shah I gold tanka dated 899h (1493).

Stock code: CM001027
£4,900
Country: India, Sultanate of Gujarat
King (reign): Nasir al-Din Mahmud Shah I, 1458 – 1511
Denomination/metal: Gold Tanka
Date/mint mark: 899h (1493).
Type Muhammadabad 'urf Champanir Mint
Ref. no: G&G G77.

Obv. Persian script with ruler's name, most of outer legend off flan as usual. Rev. Persian script in plain circular birder.
23mm, 11.43g. AEF - About Extremely Fine, well struck.

This is a very rare coin with a very clearly struck date - and in this superb condition is outstanding and desirable. Sultan Abu'l Fath Nasir al-Din Mahmud Shah I, popularly known as Mahmud Begada was the most prominent sultan of Gujarat. He was the great-grandson of Ahmad Shah I, the founder of the Muzaffarid dynasty and of the city of Ahmedabad (Ahmed Aabad) in the present-day state of Gujarat. Mahmud Shah was known to be quite religious and expanded the territory of the Gujarat Sultanate to its maximum and ruled for 43 years. He titled himself, Sultân al-Barr, Sultân al-Bahr, 'Sultan of the Land, Sultan of the Sea'. He also founded city which is called Mahemdabad, sometimes also spelt as 'Memdavad' (It is situated on the main railway-line between Ahmedabad and Mumbai).

Scotland, James VI silver 'Balance' Half-merk 1591.

Stock code: CM001102
£1,150
Country: Scotland King (reign): James VI (1567 - 1625)
Denomination/metal: Silver Merk, Half
Date/mint mark: 1591
Type Sixth Coinage
Ref. no: S 5491.

Obv. Crowned shield between two thistles, 'IACOBVS 6 D G R SCOT0RVM'. Rev. Pair of scales with sword behind, 'HIS DIFFERT REGE TYRANNVS', (In these a tyrant differs from a king).
29mm, 4.52g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck and attractive toning.

Well struck on a large flan and attractively patinated. The coin was worth six shillings and eight pence Scots – the coins of James VI's reign are considered to have the most beautiful designs and most varied legends of all Scottish coins. After the Union of the Crowns of 1603, Scottish gold and silver coins closely resembled their English counterparts.

British India (East India Company), Victoria gold Mohur frozen date 1841 (1850s), mint of Calcutta.

Stock code: CM001097
£2,350
Country: India, British King (reign): Victoria (1837 - 1901)
Denomination/metal: Gold Mohur
Date/mint mark: Frozen date 1841 (1850s)
Type Calcutta mint
Ref. no: KM 462.1.

Obv. Bust of Victoria left, hair in fillet, 'VICTORIA QUEEN'. Rev. British lion under Palm tree, 'EAST INDIA COMPANY, ONE MOHUR'.
26mm, 11.65g. EF - Extremely Fine or better - with two minor edge bruises.

This is in beautiful condition (edge bruise is hardly noticable), traces of original mint lustre with marvellous iconology – the British lion under an eastern tree. Introduced in 1851, these new East India Company coins were not legal tender. Legal tender was the silver rupee, the value of the gold mohur in rupees varied with the relative market prices of gold and silver. However, from 13 January 1841 Treasuries had been ordered to accept the mohur at the original 1835 fixed rate of 15 rupees. The discoveries of gold in Australia however soon led to speculation with people bringing gold to the Company's Mint in Calcutta to profit from the fixed official rate of 15 rupees. At the time, millions of rupees worth of gold mohurs accumulated in the Treasury (long since melted down !) resulting in a decision that from 1 January 1853 the government would not accept their own gold coins 'on acount of payment due'. Government of India passed to the British Crown in 1858 but no new legislation related to the production of gold coins was enacted until 1866, the old East India Company Acts remained in force. It is highly possible that the frozen date 1841 (type 2) mohur remained in production until 1866 when it was replaced by the Imperial Series frozen (1862 dated) issue.

Great Britain, Charles II. Milled Gold Guinea - dated 1679.

Stock code: CM000957
£7,750
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles II (1660 - 1685)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guinea
Date/mint mark: 1679
Type Fourth Bust
Ref. no: MCE 106; S 3344

Obv. Laureate bust right, 'CAROLVS II SEI GRATIA'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms in cruciform, 'C' cypher in centre, sceptres in angles, 'MAG BRI FR ET HIB REG'.
25mm, 8.24g. AEF - About Extremely Fine, strong bust, rev. a little weak.

In 1663 the ancient process of striking coins was given up for good and the Royal mint became totally mechanised under direction of the Roettier brothers whom Charles had brought back with him from the Continent on the Restitution of the Monarchy in 1660. This guinea is one of the new style milled coins and although there is a little weakness in the centre of the reverse, the portrait of Charles is particularly strong. It is thus attractive and therefore desirable.

Anglo-Gallic, Henry VI gold Salut d'Or (22s. 6d.) issued in Normandy between 1433 and 1444.

Stock code: CM000991
£1,150
Country: England
King (reign): Henry VI (1422 - 1461)
Denomination/metal: Gold Salut d'Or
Date/mint mark: 1433 – 1444
Type Rouen Mint, 2nd type.
Ref. no: Elias 270c

Obv. The Arms of France and England born by the Virgin Mary (left) and the angel Gabriel right and the word 'AVE' under sun's rays between them, 'HENRICVS DEI GRA FRACORV Z AGLIE REX'. 'Lion' mintmark at beginning of legend. Rev. Latin cross dividing fleur de lis and leopard (lion) passant guardant, 'h' below, 'XPCV VINCIT XPC REGNAT XPC IMPERAT', (Christ conquers, Christ rules, Christ commands)
27mm, 3.44g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, strongly stuck, clear and sharp definition. Minor edge fold at 10 o' clock.

Handsome coin struck in France for the Lancastrian king of both England and France. We know that this piece was struck by the Rouen mintmaster Etienne Marcel because of his privy mark, a pellet within an annulet, under the last letter of both obverse and reverse legends and are recorded as having been issued between March 1433 and October 1444. Marvellous iconography for the unification of both countries. In 1422 the year old king of England inherited the French throne through his mad grandfather Charles VI of France. Under the regency of the Duke of Bedford Henry soon issued coins at various French mints and this one was struck at Rouen which is denoted by the lion mintmark at the beginning of the legend. Ten years later Joan of Arc would make an appearance which would eventually loosen the English grip on France until by 1436 only Normandy and part of Maine remained in Henry's control.

Princely State of Hyderabad, Afzal ad-Daula gold Mohur dated regnal year 18 1273h (1857), mint of Hyderabad.

Stock code: CM001042
£650
Country: India, Princely State of Hyderabad
King (reign): Afzal ad-Daula, 1857 – 1869
Denomination/metal: Gold Mohur
Date/mint mark: Regnal year 18 (of previous monarch), 1273h (1857).
Type Hyderabad Mint
Ref. no: KM C96.

Obv. Persian script - Rulers's titles and date, However in the previous monarch's name 'Bahadur Shah II'. Rev. Persian script - mint epithet, regnal year – but of previous monarch.
21mm, 11.16g. EF - Extremely Fine

Good condition and interesting as although struck in the first year of Afzal ad-Daula's reign, this coin continuES the name of the previous monarch with his regnal year ! Afzal ad-Daula's realm was divided into five 'subahs' and sixteen districts; each subah was headed by a Subedar and each district by a Taluqdar. Reforms during his reign, by his Prime Minister Salar Jung, included the establishment of a governmental central treasury in 1855. He also reformed the Hyderabad revenue and judicial systems, instituted a postal service and constructed the first rail and telegraph networks. In 1861 he was awarded the Star of India.

Mughal Empire, Ahmad Shah Bahadur gold Mohur dated regnal year 7, 1167h (1754), mint of Delhi.

Stock code: CM001038
£800
Country: India, Mughal Empire
King (reign): Ahmad Shah Bahadur, 1707 – 1712
Denomination/metal: Gold Mohur
Date/mint mark: Regnal year 7 – 1167h (1754).
Type Dar al-Khilifat, Shahjahanabad Mint (Delhi).
Ref. no: KM 449.12.

Obv. Persian script – Rulers's titles and date (last character '7'). Rev. Persian script - mint epithet, regnal year.
22mm, 10.86g. EF - Extremely Fine, well struck.

Very good condition, well struck, little to no wear and a large flan – very attractive piece of this only six year emperor. Ahmed Shah Bahadur inherited a much weakened Mughal state. When Ahmed Shah Bahadur came to power the rule of the Mughal Empire was collapsing, furthermore his administrative weaknesses eventually led to the rise of his Vizier. He was emperor in title for six years, but left all affairs to state to rivalling factions. He was deposed by the Vizier Imad-ul-Mulk and later had his eyes gouged out along with his mother. After his overthrow, he was imprisoned at the Salimgarh Fort where he stayed for the rest of his life, finally dying in 1775 at the age of 50 during the reign of Emperor Shah Alam II. One of his sons, Bidar Bakhsh reigned briefly in 1788.

(British Guyana) Essequibo & Demerara, George III silver Two-Gilders, 1809. Outstanding example!

Stock code: CM001017
£3,250
Country: British Guiana (Essequibo & Demerera)
King (reign): George III (1760 - 1820)
Denomination/metal: Silver Lira, 100
Date/mint mark: 1809
Type Early strike
Ref. no: Pr 7; KM 7.

Obv. Laureate, cuirassed bust right, 'GEORGIVS III DEI GRATIA'. Rev. Crowned '2' in a an oaken wreath, 'COLONIES OF ESSEQUEBO & DEMARARY TOKEN'.
33mm, 15.54g. PROOF - Fleur de Coin, semi proof-like fields, abnormally strong strike, beautiful toning of blue/orange tints.

Normally this piece was issued very weakly struck – ie no details of laurel wreath and ear on George's portrait. However. A in the 1970s six showed up that were, like this, superiorly struck with good strong detail. It is supposed that these were early strikes – carefully made to give this superior quality perhaps as presentation pieces in these British colonies that were just being established. They had been Dutch [hence the denomination], briefly French and were occupied by Britain in 1803 and under the Treaty of London in 1814 became formerly British and a few years later part of British Guyana. The old Dutch capital Starbroek had its name changed to 'Georgetown'. Excessively rare in this quality of strike and condition, also beautifully toned with orange and blue tinges to the lustre. Outstanding example !

Ireland Great Rebellion, silver Halfcrown. 'Ormonde money' issued 1643 – 1644.

Stock code: CM001104
£1,000
Country: England, Stuart King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown, Half
Date/mint mark: 1643-1644
Type Lords Justices' issue ('Ormonde')
Ref. no: S 6545.

Obv. Crown over large 'CR' Rev. large denomination 'IIS VID'
35mm, 14.95g. AVF - About very Fine, lightly toned.

Particularly good example of this 'Ormonde' issue and thus rare. During the period of the Great Rebellion in Ireland and the English Civil War a number of crudely made local coinages were produced in Ireland, mostly in Dublin. These coinage were almost exclusively of silver plate cut and struck into a number of denominations with simple patterns including often their weight or value. Most common among these issues is the 'Ormond Money' issued by the Lord Justice the Earl of Ormond in about 1642-1645 (James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde KG, PC (1610–1688) was an Anglo-Irish statesman and soldier, known as Earl of Ormonde from 1634 to 1642 and Marquess of Ormonde from 1642 to 1661. His friend, the 1st Earl of Strafford, caused him to be appointed the commander of the Cavalier forces in Ireland. 1641 to 1647, he led the fighting against the Irish Catholic Confederation. 1649 to 1650 he led the Royalist forces fighting against Cromwell In the 1650s he fled Ireland to exile in Europe with Charles II

Princely State of Awadh, Wajid 'Ali I gold ashrafi issued at Lakhnau and dated 1266h (1851).

Stock code: CM001095
£1,500
Country: India, Princely State of Awadh
King (reign): Wajid 'Ali, 1847 – 1856
Denomination/metal: Gold Ashrafi
Date/mint mark: 1266 AH = 1851
Type Lakhnau mint
Ref. no: KM 378.1.

Obv. Persian script with date 1266h Rev. Crest of two mermaids holding clubs and flags. Regnal year '4'.
22mm, 10.72g. EF - Extremely Fine, some original lustre, full flan.

Exceptional example – virtually no wear, well struck on a large flan and considerable amounts of original lustre. Wajid 'Ali Shah was the tenth and last Nawab of the state of Awadh in present day Uttar Pradesh in India. He ascended the throne of Awadh in 1847 and ruled for nine years. His kingdom, long protected by the British under treaty, was eventually annexed peacefully on 11 February 1856 – days before the ninth anniversary of his coronation. The Nawab was exiled to Garden Reach in Metiabruz, then a suburb of Calcutta, where he lived out the rest of his life off a generous pension. He was a poet, playwright, dancer and great patron of the arts. He is widely credited with the revival of Kathak as a major form of classical Indian dance

Sultanate of Gujarat, Mahmud Shah III gold tanka dated 951h (1543).

Stock code: CM001094
£8,000
Country: India, Sultanate of Gujarat
King (reign): Mahmud Shah III, 1537 – 1553
Denomination/metal: Gold Tanka
Date/mint mark: 951 AH = 1543
Type Muhammadabad mint ?

Obv. Persian script – 'Wathiq' with date 951h Rev. Persian script
18mm, 11.97g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck with toning.

Very attractive coin in such good condition, nicely toned, clear date and good form – a very good example. Nasir al-Din Mahmud Shah II punished one of his attendants, Burhan al-Din, for disrespectful behaviour, but Burhan retaliated by assassinating the sultan and a number of his nobles, and seized the throne for himself !

Monaco, Charles III gold 100 Francs 1882. Rare.

Stock code: CM001021
£1,450
Country: Monaco
King (reign): Charles III, 1856 – 1889
Denomination/metal: Gold Tanka
Date/mint mark: 1882
Type Paris Mint
Ref. no: Gad 122; F 11.

Obv. Bare head right with goatee, 'CHARLES III PRINCE DE MONACO'. Rev. Arms of principality in heavily draped shield with supporters, ' CENT FRANCS'.
35mm, 32.26g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine.

Rare coin, this date has the lowest mintage of the series - only 5,000.

Scotland, David II silver half-groat issued at Edinburgh 1357 – 1367.

Stock code: CM001099
£1,200
Country: Scotland
King (reign): David II (1329 - 1371)
Denomination/metal: Silver Groat, Half
Date/mint mark: 1357 -1367
Type Second Coinage, Old bust, Edinburgh mint
Ref. no: S 5110.

Obv. Large crowned 'old' bust left, DAVID DEI GRACIA REX SCOTVRVM'. Rev. Long cross potent, mullets in angles, small 'D' in one quarter, outer, 'DEVS PROTECTOR MEVS ' (God is my protector) inner, 'VILLA EDINGVRGH'.
24mm, 2g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, well struck with attractive iridescent toning.

Beautiful little coin – strong portrait and legend, attractively patinated. Rare thus. David was married at the age of 4 to Joan the 7 year old daughter of Edward II. He succeeded to the throne the following year on the death of his father Robert I and was crowned at Scone in 1331. The regency was in the hands of Thomas Randolph of Moray until he and David were overthrown in 1332 by Edward Balliol (son of John Balliol) at the Battle of Dupplin Moor near Perth. David was restored to the throne the following year but again overthrown when Balliol returned with Edward III and defeated the Scots at Halidon hill. David and Joan fled to France where they were guests of King Phillip VI. In 1341 the Scottish nobles under Robert Stewart gained the upper hand and David and Joan were able to return to Scotland and were restored to the throne. Five years later in 1346 David attacked England in support of France while Edward III was away fighting in France. The Scots were defeated at Nevillie’s Cross near Durham where David was injured and taken prisoner. He was held captive in England for 11 years until 1357 when under the Treaty of Berwick he was allowed to return to Scotland for a ransom of 100,000 merks ‘A King’s Ransom’. The full amount was never paid and it was in this period that this coin was issued.

Anglo-Gallic, Henry VI gold Salut d'Or (22s. 6d.) issued in Normandy between 1433 and 1444.

Stock code: CM000998
£1,750
Country: England
King (reign): Henry VI (1422 - 1461)
Denomination/metal: Gold Salut d'Or
Date/mint mark: 1433 – 1444
Type Rouen Mint, 2nd type.
Ref. no: Elias 270c

Obv. The Arms of France and England born by the Virgin Mary (left) and the angel Gabriel right and the word 'AVE' under sun's rays between them, 'HENRICVS DEI GRA FRACORV Z AGLIE REX'. 'Lion' mintmark at beginning of legend. Rev. Latin cross dividing fleur de lis and leopard (lion) passant guardant, 'h' below, 'XPCV VINCIT XPC REGNAT XPC IMPERAT', (Christ conquers, Christ rules, Christ commands)
27mm, 3.42g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, strongly stuck, Madonna's face a little weak as usual for this mint.

Handsome coin struck in France for the Lancastrian king of both England and France. We know that this piece was struck by the Rouen mintmaster Etienne Marcel because of his privy mark, a pellet within an annulet, under the last letter of both obverse and reverse legends and are recorded as having been issued between March 1433 and October 1444. Marvellous iconography for the unification of both countries. In 1422 the year old king of England inherited the French throne through his mad grandfather Charles VI of France. Under the regency of the Duke of Bedford Henry soon issued coins at various French mints and this one was struck at Rouen which is denoted by the lion mintmark at the beginning of the legend. Ten years later Joan of Arc would make an appearance which would eventually loosen the English grip on France until by 1436 only Normandy and part of Maine remained in Henry's control.

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