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England - Charles I, Gold Triple Unite, minted Oxford during the Civil War, 1642

Stock code: CM000481X
£98,500
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Gold Pounds, Three (Triple Unite)
Date/mint mark: 1642
Type Oxford Mint, 'Declaration'
Ref. no: Schneider 286; N 2381; S 2724

Obv. Half length tall figure of Charles to left, wearing crown and full armour holding a sword and an olive branch. Plumes behind, 'CAROLVS DG MAG BRIT FRAN ET HI REX'. Rev. Declaration in a three line scroll, 'RELIG PROT / LEG ANG / LIBER PAR' (Protestant Religion, Laws of England, Liberty of Parliament), three plumes above with mark of value, date below; around 'EXVRGAT DEVS DISSIPENTVR INIMICI' (Let God arise and let the enemy be scattered).
46mm, 27g. GVF - Good Very Fine, strongly struck

TheTripleUnite, valued atsixty shillings, 60/-or three pounds, was the highestEnglishdenomination to be produced. It was struck at the Oxford Mint set up during the first English Civil War of 1642-6 and issued between January and March of 1642 at the hurriedly set up mint at New Inn Hall in Oxford. This huge coin was issued, at least in part, for use as gifts to those whom the King wished to 'cement' to his side in the Civil War. Thus he obverse design for the coin features an armoured bust of Charles I, with broadsword raised, and yet in visual dichotomy he bears an olive branch clutched over his heart. Charles was visually appealing to either nature of the benefactor he was seeking to entice. The bust on this coin is very hawkish which is the earliest type, later he had it changed to a more benevolent softer style. On the reverse he put his famous declaration – uttered in 1642 when he swore to to uphold the Protestant Religion, the laws of England and the freedom of Parliament. Very rare and spectacular coin!

Great Britain, Anne bronze medal 1713 for the Treaty of Utrecht

Stock code: CM000017
£375
Country: Great Britain
Date/mint mark: 1713
Type: Struck
Ref. no: MI II 399/256; E458

Obv. Laureate draped bust of Anne left Rev. Britannia seated half left, holding olive branch, men ploughing and ships sailing behind
58mm, 61.32g. AEF - About Extremely Fine, good even toning

Peace of Utrecht 1713. silver medal by J. Croker commemorating the Treaty of Utrecht which concluded the war of the Spanish Succession between Britain, Prussia, Austria and the NL against France and Spain. PRETTY AND GOOD CONDITION MEDAL OF THE END OF THE WAR THAT SHAPED EUROPE AS IT IS TODAY.

Great Britain, Peninsular War, Wellington gilt medal 1812 - British Army enters Madrid

Stock code: CM000003
£300
Country: Great Britain
Type: Cast
Ref. no: BHM 737; E1025

Obv. Bust left of Duke of Wellington Rev. Altar with arms of Britain, Portugal and Spain, around arms and colours
47mm, 13.35g. EF - Extremely Fine. Made of two clichees that have been joined together to produce the single medal. Consequently the inside of the medal is hollow – or is filled with soft packing and thus, in parts, the medal is a little ‘concave’.

British Army enters Madrid 1812. Medal by Wyon to celebrate the taking of Madrid on the 12th. of August 1812. The French had occupied the city from March 1808 but after losing the battle of Salamanca a few days earlier, they fled the city. RARE VARIATION OF THIS MEDAL. (UNRECORDED)

England, gold 'Britain' Crown of James I, struck between 1615 & 1616.

Stock code: CM000660
£925
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): James I (1603 - 1625)
Denomination/metal: Gold Crown
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Tun' – 1615 – 16.
Type Second Coinage, Fifth bust.
Ref. no: Schneider 52; N 2092; S 2623.

Obv. Crowned, cuirassed bust of king right , 'IACOBVS D G MAG BRIT FRA ET HI REX'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms, 'IR' by crown, 'HENRICVS ROSAS REGNA IACOBVS', (Henry [united] the roses, James the kingdoms).
21mm, 2.37g. VF - Very Fine, some parts of legend weakly struck.

Very pretty and quite scarce little gold 5 shilling piece of James I although some of the legend is not well struck up – as so often in small coins. They appear not to have minted that many of them (as there was already a silver crown) – and certainly they do not turn up as often as some of the larger gold denominations. It is called a 'Britain' crown because the first coin in the series ( issued initially in 1604 or 05) was the first coin to use the term 'Britain' in the legend. Up until this date all English coins referred to England and Scottish coins to Scotland. James enthusiasm for a United Kingdom of Great Britain can be further seen in the reverse legend where he sees himself as' uniter' of the two countries as his Stuart ancestor Henry VII united the red and the white rose thus ending the terrible civil war that had raged for many tens of years in the fifteenth century. Very interesting little coin!

Great Britain, George III Silver Shilling 1763, 'Northumberland' Issue

Stock code: CM000644
£1,750
Country: England, Hanoverian
King (reign): George III (1760 - 1820)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: 1763
Type 'Northumberland' Issue
Ref. no: S 3742

Obv. Laureate draped young bust right, 'GEORGIVS III DEI GRATIA'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms in cruciform, Garter star in centre, 'M B F ET H REX F D B ET L D S R I A T ET E, 1763'.
26mm, 6g. UC - Uncirculated, lustrous with good toning.

No large silver denominations were issued in the early and middle period of George III's reign, in fact the first official shilling was only issued in 1787 – ie. 27 years after he came to the throne. However, there was one small unofficial output of shillings in 1763 - the 'Northumberland Shilling'. It was distributed by Hugh Percy, Earl of Northumberland on his installation in Dublin as Viceroy of Ireland. About 150 pounds worth was minted, representing 3000 shillings, ie a very small mintage. Due to the shortage of silver in circulation these coins were actually used, rather than saved as mementos of the occasion of their distribution in Ireland. This example is in very good condition having a marvellous toning with underlying brilliance. Exceptional example of a rare coin.

England, William III silver Halfcrown 1700, almost mint condition.

Stock code: CM000686
£1,025
Country: England, Hanoverian
King (reign): William III (1694 – 1702)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown, Half
Date/mint mark: 1700 DVODECIMO
Type First Bust, modified large shields
Ref. no: ESC 561; S 3494

Obv. Laureate draped bust right, 'GVLIELMVS III DEI GRA'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms in cruciform, Lion of Orange in centre, 'MAG BR FRA ET HIB REX'.
34mm, 14.87g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, Rev. better, with considerable amounts of original lustre

Very pretty coin, almost uncirculated with beautiful original lustre – particularly the reverse. Not a rare date but very rare to find in this almost pristine condition.

England, Charles II cast silver medal issued in 1660 to celebrate the ‘Restitution of the Monarchy’.

Stock code: CM000002X
£600
Country: England
Type: Cast
Ref. no: MI I 453/38; E215

Obv. Draped bust of Charles right Rev. Leafless tree bearing three crowns, under a radiant sun.
35mm, 7.73g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, good blue tone. Ornate suspension loop

Restoration medal by T. Rawlins. - To be worn by Royalist supporters on the return of the King. Leafless tree represents Royalty deprived of its honours which now with the restoration, will begin to flourish. RARE - USUALLY FOUND VERY WORN.

England , 'Fine' gold Half Angel of Elizabeth I, struck between 1573 & 1578.

Stock code: CM000653
£4,600
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603)
Denomination/metal: Gold Angel, Half
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Eglantine' – 1573 -78.
Type Second Issue
Ref. no: Schneider 7771; N 11992/1; S 2517.

Obv. The angel St. Michael spearing fallen dragon like devil 'ELIZABETH D G ANG FR ET HI REGINA'. Rev. ancient ship with central mast a cross upon which is the Royal Arms, 'E' and rose either side,' ADNO FACTVM EST ISTVD ET EST MIRA' , (This is the Lord's doing, and marvellous in our eyes).
20mm, 2.59g. GVF - Good Very Fine, Well struck – collector's mark.

The half-Angel was not struck in large quantities during Elizabeth’s reign and by the end of her reign the coin was being generally phased out . This is a particularly nicely struck piece with little wear and thus good crisp detail to the angel's face and body. All the legend, either side' s complete and clearly readable, There is a small collector's mark on the middle of the boat below the point of the shield – but this distracts little form an otherwise very pretty little coin.

Anglo-Saxon England, Edward 'the Martyr'. Silver Penny, struck at Stamford, circa 978.

Stock code: CM000952
£7,500
Country: England, Anglo-Saxon
King (reign): Edward the Martyr, 975 – 978
Denomination/metal: Silver Penny
Date/mint mark: Circa 978.
Type Stamford Mint
Ref. no: N 763; S 1142

Obv. Diademed bust left, 'EADPEARD REX ANGL'. Rev. Small cross pattee in centre, 'OGE M-O ZTANFOR', (Oge at Stamford).
21mm, 1.15g. GVF - Good Very Fine with a boldly struck portrait, although some legend a little weak.

Very rare coin of this short lived Saxon king of all England, struck at the end of his reign around 978. Boldly struck, although crude but quaint, portrait with good grey toning. Edward the Martyr was king of all England from 975 until he was murdered in 978. He was the eldest son of King Edgar but was not his father's acknowledged heir. On Edgar's death, the leadership of England was contested, with some supporting Edward's claim to be king and others supporting his much younger half-brother Æthelred (the Unready) who was the legitimate son of Edgar. Edward was chosen as king and was crowned by his main clerical supporters, the archbishops Dunstan and Oswald of Worcester. The great nobles of the kingdom, earls Ælfhere and Æthelwine, quarrelled, and civil war almost broke out. In the so-called anti-monastic reaction, the nobles took advantage of Edward's weakness to dispossess the Benedictine reformed monasteries of lands and other properties that King Edgar had granted to them. Edward's short reign was brought to an end by his murder at Corfe Castle in circumstances that are not altogether clear. His body was reburied with great ceremony at Shaftesbury Abbey early in 980. In 1001 Edward's remains were moved to a more prominent place in the abbey, probably with the blessing of his half-brother King Æthelred. Edward was already reckoned a saint by this time. A number of lives of Edward were written in the centuries following his death in which he was portrayed as a martyr, generally seen as a victim of the Queen Dowager Ælfthryth, mother of Æthelred. He is today recognized as a saint in the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Roman Catholic Church, and the Anglican Communion.

England, Gold Half-Sovereign of Edward VI. Struck at the Tower, c1552.

Stock code: CM000953
£9,000
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Edward VI (1547 - 1553)
Denomination/metal: Gold Sovereign, Half
Date/mint mark: mm. tun; 1551 – 1553
Type Tower Mint, Third period (Fine Issue)
Ref. no: Schneider 697var; N 1928; S 12451.

Obv. Half length figure of the king right, crowned and in full armour holding crown and sceptre, 'EDWARD' VI D' G' AGL' FRANCI' Z HIB' REX'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms DIVIDING,'ER', 'IhS AVTEM TRANSIENS PER MEDI' ILLO' IBAT', (But Jesus, passing through the midst of them, went on his way).
31mm, 5.5g. VF - Very Fine, well struck, no weak areas with good portrait.

This half sovereign of 10 shillings issued in the latter part of the Boy King's reign, ie when he was only about thirteen and is a superb contemporary portrait of Edward VI. Although the piece has seen a small amount of wear the portrait is well struck to give sharp facial features and shows up his armour well. Then reverse is particularly good and both legends are complete with no weak areas. It is consequently am desirable piece and rare in this grade of preservation. In February 1553, at age 15, Edward fell ill. When his sickness was discovered to be terminal, he and his Council drew up a "Devise for the Succession", attempting to prevent the country being returned to Catholicism. Edward named his cousin Lady Jane Grey as his heir and excluded his half sisters, Mary and Elizabeth. However, this was disputed following Edward's death and Jane was queen for only nine days before Edward's half-sister, Mary, was proclaimed Queen. She reversed Edward's Protestant reforms, which nonetheless became the basis of the Elizabethan Religious Settlement of 1559.

England, Charles I. Gold Unite (20 shillings), issued 1636 – 1638.

Stock code: CM000954
£4,750
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Gold Unite
Date/mint mark: mm. tun, 1636 – 1638
Type Group 'D', Class 5.

Obv. Crowned, draped bust left, denomination 'XX; to right, CAROLVS D' G' MA' BR' FR' RT HI' REX'. Rev. Crowned, garnished oval Royal Arms dividing crowned 'CR', FLORENT CONCORDI REGNA' (through concord kingdoms flourish).
32mm, 9.06g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck although rev. a little off centre.

Superb condition with marvellously bold portrait of Charles. No weak areas – legends all sharp, although rev. struck a little off-centre. Very attractive coin and rare and desirable thus.

Isle of Man, Silver Crown of 1811 - issued by the Douglas Bank. Excessively rare!

Stock code: CM000955
£11,250
Country: Isle of Man
King (reign): Dove & Co. Bank, Douglas
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: 1811
Type Bank token
Ref. no: D 1; Prid 46; Q 68

Obv. View of Peel castle over the bay from the quayside. Rev. Name of issuer, denomination and date.
35mm, 15.42g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, bright with brilliant proof-like surfaces.

Excessively rare piece – only known from three or four specimens (one which belonged to Sir George Chetwynd which was auctioned in 1872 by Christies which Davis valued in 1904 as “no exaggeration thirty guineas” !). Probably struck for the partners of the bank when the copper token series was minted in 1811 – possibly as a prospective pattern for further bank issue. The bank was founded on the 27th. November 1811 and was initially situated in Fort Street in Douglas and then for the rest of its existence in Duke street. The partners were William Scarlett Littler, the Rev Robert Littler and James Dove. Some £20 worth of copper and silver tokens were prepared for use but after only three or four weeks some difference regarding policy arose between the partners resulting in James Dove suing Robert Littler who was arrested while trying to leave the island. This arrest was waived on the 3rd. of January 1812 but the banking business ceased to operate after only just over a month's operation!

Celtic Britain, Gold Stater of Anted king of the DOBUNNI. Issued c20-43 AD.

Stock code: CM000956
£1,750
Country: England, Celtic
King (reign): Anted (c20-43 AD)
Denomination/metal: Gold Stater
Date/mint mark: Circa 20-43 AD

Ref. no: Rudd ABC 2066; vA 1069; S 379.

Obv. Fern-like emblem of the Dobunni. Rev. Stylised horse with triple tail right, wheel below, cross, crescent and pellets above, 'ANTED' and below horse's nose to right 'R[IG]', (possibly for Rex, [king]).
18mm, 6.2g. GVF - Good Very Fine and pretty centrally struck.

The Dobunni Celts lived in the part of south western Britain that today broadly coincides with the counties of North Somerset, Bristol, and Gloucestershire - their territory contained two large towns (Corinium Dobunnorum now Cirencester, and Colonia Nerviana Glevum now Gloucester). Besides this there were numerous smaller towns, and many rich villas. They were not a warlike people but farmers and were probably vassals of the tribe to their east, the Catevellauni. They submitted to the Romans even before they reached their lands and afterwards readily adopted the Romano-British lifestyle. Little is known of the Anted named on this coin, except that from find evidence which gives us a rough date of issue ie 20 - 43 AD. It is not even known if he ruled in succession or at the same time as the other kings/chieftains named on Dobunnic coins. The strange fern-like object on the coin is the badge or arms of the tribe and occurs on most Dobunnic staters. This coin is a very good example of this issue – the king's name is mainly there (often totally missing), it is well centred and in little worn condition – an attractive coin!

Great Britain, Charles II. Milled Gold Guinea - dated 1679.

Stock code: CM000957
£7,750
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles II (1660 - 1685)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guinea
Date/mint mark: 1679
Type Fourth Bust
Ref. no: MCE 106; S 3344

Obv. Laureate bust right, 'CAROLVS II SEI GRATIA'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms in cruciform, 'C' cypher in centre, sceptres in angles, 'MAG BRI FR ET HIB REG'.
25mm, 8.24g. AEF - About Extremely Fine, strong bust, rev. a little weak.

In 1663 the ancient process of striking coins was given up for good and the Royal mint became totally mechanised under direction of the Roettier brothers whom Charles had brought back with him from the Continent on the Restitution of the Monarchy in 1660. This guinea is one of the new style milled coins and although there is a little weakness in the centre of the reverse, the portrait of Charles is particularly strong. It is thus attractive and therefore desirable.

Great Britain, Anne. Post Union Gold Guinea, dated 1710.

Stock code: CM000958
£3,900
Country: England, Stuart King (reign): Anne (1702 - 1714)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guinea
Date/mint mark: 1710
Type Post Union, Third Draped Bust.
Ref. no: MCR 222; S 3574

Obv. Draped bust left, 'ANNA DEI GRATIA'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms in cruciform, garter star centre, sceptres in angles, 'MAG BRI FR ET HIB REG'.
25mm, 8.31g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, traces of original lustre – especially on rev.

Although this is the regular issue this piece is a particularly nice example – only exhibiting a small amount of wear on the upper curls of Anne's hair by her ear in the centre of the coin. The coin exhibits traces of original lustre particularly on the reverse which can be seen specifically in the protected areas of the fields either side. All in all a very pretty little coin and a good example.

Great Britain, Anne. Post Union Gold Guinea - dated 1712.

Stock code: CM000959
£3,900
Country: England, Stuart King (reign): Anne (1702 - 1714)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guinea
Date/mint mark: 1712
Type Post Union, Third Draped Bust.
Ref. no: MCE 224; S 3574

Obv. Draped bust left, 'ANNA DEI GRATIA'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms in cruciform, garter star centre, sceptres in angles, 'MAG BRI FR ET HIB REG'.
25mm, 8.33g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, traces of original lustre – especially on rev.

Although this is the regular issue this piece is a particularly nice example – only exhibiting a small amount of wear on the upper curls of Anne's hair by her ear in the centre of the coin. The coin exhibits traces of original lustre particularly on the reverse which can be seen specifically in the protected areas of the fields either side. All in all a very pretty little coin and a good example.

Great Britain, George II. Gold Guinea, dated 1726.

Stock code: CM000960
£2,500
Country: England, Hanoverian
King (reign): George I (1714 - 1727)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guinea
Date/mint mark: 1726
Type Fifth Bust
Ref. no: MCE 261; S 3633

Obv. Laureate long-haired bust left, 'GEORGIVS II D G M BR FR ET HIB REX F D'.'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms in cruciform, Garter cross in centre, sceptres in angles, 'BRVN ET DVX SRI TH ET EL' (Duke of Brunswick, Prince and Elector of the Holy Roman Empire).
24mm, 8.31g. GVF - Good Very Fine or better.

Attractive coin – some wear but all details clear and 'problem-free'. George II was the last British monarch to be born outside Britain and the last British Monarch to lead his troops into battle - against the Austrians in South Germany at Dettingen in 1743.

Great Britain, large Gold Five-Pounds piece of George II, dated 1748 VICESIMO SECVNDO.

Stock code: CM000961
£20,000
Country: England, Hanoverian
King (reign): George II (1727 - 1760)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guineas, Five
Date/mint mark: 1748
Type Old Laureate Head
Ref. no: MCE 286; S 3666

Obv. Laureate long-haired bust left, 'GEORGIVS II DEI GRATIA'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms in an ornate ogee shield. Legend – initials of British and German titles.
27mm, 41.79g. GVF - Good Very Fine or better.

Large and splendid gold coin in good condition. George II was the last British monarch to be born outside Britain and the last British Monarch to lead his troops into battle - against the Austrians in South Germany at Dettingen in 1743.

England, Charles I silver lozenge shaped shilling 1645, emergency issue at Newark besieged.

Stock code: CM000974
£2,750
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: 1645
Type Civil War Obsidional Coinage, Newark besieged.
Ref. no: Brooker 1224; N 2640. S 3142.

Obv. Crown dividing 'CR' over denomination (XII). Rev. 'OBS / NEWARKE / 1645' (money of necessity, Newark, 1645).
39mm, 5.98g. VF - Very Fine with nice grey toning

Lozenge shaped shilling issued during the third siege of Newark in 1645, good patination and rare and interesting coin. In the latter part of the Civil War Royalist Soldiers from the Newark garrison fought at Marston Moor. The defeat of the Royalists in what was a battle for supremacy in the north of England had to have a negative impact on Newark. The overwhelming defeat of the Royalists at Naseby – to the south of Newark – meant that the town was effectively trapped by Parliament both to the north and the south. On November 26th 1645, troops from Scotland started to besiege Newark from the north while Parliamentarian forces did the same from the south. This was the third time Newark was besieged during the Civil War. The garrison aggressively defended the town and during a harsh winter the Scots built up siege works manned by 16,000 men. They also tried to dam the River Deven so that the grain mills in the town were starved of any form of power. Regardless of this, Newark held out. It was at this point that there was a great need to be able to pay the defending soldiers that they 'remained on side ' all the silver flatware and platter was gathered up and hammered into large sheets which were then cut out in lozenge shapes in the weights of Halfcrowns, Shillings and sixpences . These siege coins are of a very good quality, with weights of the correct official standards, and this particular piece is the second of two dates that exist. Sometimes the decoration of original piece of silver can just be seen on these coins which gives them added interest. The townspeople who survived later wrote that food was so scarce that they had to eat horses and dogs. Plague was also a major day-to-day problem in the town. However, the town held out until it was ordered to surrender by Charles who was made to order the surrender as part of the conditions of his surrender. Newark surrendered on May 8th 1646.

England, Charles I. Gold Unite (20 shillings), 1625 – in magnificent condition.

Stock code: CM000967
£5,900
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Gold Unite
Date/mint mark: mm. lis, 1625.
Type Tower Mint, Group 'A', Class II.
Ref. no: Schneider 114-115; Brooker 22; N 2146; S 2685

Obv. Bust of king left with high double crown wearing coronation robes with large ruff; denomination 'XX' behind head, 'CAROLVS : D : G : MAG : BRI : FRA : ET : HI : REX'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms, square topped and garnished, 'FLORENT CONCORDIA REGNA', (through concord kingdoms flourish).
34mm, 8.89g. EF - Extremely Fine or better, superb strike magnificent portrait, small mark behind shoulder.

Superb example – must rank as one of the finest known. Portrait strong and clear only the slightest trace of light handling (mark behind bust), good detail in ruff and order round his shoulders. Reverse a little double struck - so not as sharp as obverse - but still a peerless coin! This coin was issued in the first year of Charles's reign, 1625, and he is featured on this coin in his coronation robes. It is interesting to note his ornate ruff, (a style of Spanish origin that was about to go out of fashion and flat lace collars would come in) and his ermine cloak collar and order, part of the ceremonial 'Coronation' robes.

England, Charles I. Gold Unite (20 shillings), 1625 – in magnificent condition.

Stock code: CM000968
£5,700
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Gold Unite
Type Tower Mint, Group 'A', Class II.
Ref. no: Schneider 114-115; Brooker 22; N 2146; S 2685

Obv. Bust of king left with high double crown wearing coronation robes with large ruff. Denomination 'XX' behind head, 'CAROLVS : D : G : MAG : BRIT : FRA : ET : HI : REX'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms, square topped and garnished, 'FLORENT CONCORDIA REGNA', (through concord kingdoms flourish).
35mm, 9g. EF - Extremely Fine or better, superb strike magnificent portrait, attractive toning.

Superb example – must rank as one of the finest known. Portrait strong and clear only the slightest trace of wear, good detail in ruff and order round his shoulders (although just the slightest weakness at this point) a peerless coin! This coin was issued in the first year of Charles's reign, 1625, and he is featured on this coin in his coronation robes. It is interesting to note his ornate ruff, (a style of Spanish origin that was about to go out of fashion and flat lace collars would come in) and his ermine cloak collar and order, part of the ceremonial 'Coronation' robes.

England, Philip & Mary. Silver Shilling, 1554. The Only English issue bearing Spanish king.

Stock code: CM000966
£3,000
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Philip and Mary (1554 - 1558)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: 1554
Type Full Titles
Ref. no: S 2500; N 1967

Obv. Busts of Philip and Mary vis-a-vis, crown dividing date above, 'PHILIP ET MARIA D G R ANG FR NEAP PR HISP'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms with Spanish arms in first quarter, denomination (XII) above, 'POSVIMUS DEVM ADJVTOREM NOSTRVM',(We have made God our helper).
30mm, 6.27g. GVF - Good Very fine, strongly struck with sharp detail.

When Queen Mary married Philip II of Spain as consort he became king which meant technically he ruled England as the senior Royal (as a man). For nearly four years Philip was not only king of Spain but also king of England and with Mary he tried to bring the kingdom back into the Catholic fold - from which Mary's father, Henry VIII had 'wrenched' it. Struck for only two years this coin is not only rare but a tremendously interesting token of the religious struggle which was going on at this time. It is also a very good example as it is very difficult to find both portraits well struck up (often one is quite weak). Also all the peripheral legend on each side is clear and legible – again difficult to find and with the fact that this piece has seen little wear makes this example a very desirable coin.

England, spectacular Gold Pound of Elizabeth I, struck between 1595 & 1598.

Stock code: CM000969
£16,500
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603)
Denomination/metal: Gold Pound
Date/mint mark: mm. key over woolpack; 1595 - 1598.
Type Sixth issue
Ref. no: Schneider 801; N 2008; S 2534

Obv. Crowned large bust left, wearing elaborate bodice and small ruff, 'ELIZABETH D' G' ANG' FRA' ET HIBER' REGINA'. Rev. Crowned square topped Royal Arms dividing the initials 'ER', 'SCVTVM FIDEI PROTEGET EAM', (The shield of Faith shall protect her).
39mm, 10.98g. GVF - Good Very Fine with no weak areas and sharply defined portrait, small edge flaw at 9 o' clock.

Very spectacular and iconic piece of this well known Tudor Queen. It has seen very little wear and is well struck making a beautifully clear portrait. It is interesting to note that here they are using a previous die made in c1595 and have simply re-engraved the mintmark 'key' over the original mark of 'woolpack'. A pleasing coin – both spectacular and rare. Though Elizabeth followed a largely defensive foreign policy, her reign raised England's status abroad. "She is only a woman, only mistress of half an island," marvelled Pope Sixtus V, "and yet she makes herself feared by Spain, by France, by the Empire, by all". Under Elizabeth, England gained a new self-confidence and sense of sovereignty, as Christendom fragmented. Elizabeth was the first Tudor to recognise that a monarch ruled by popular consent. She therefore always worked with parliament and advisers she could trust to tell her the truth - a style of government that her Stuart successors failed to follow.

England, James I. First issue Silver Crown, 1603 – 1604. In superb condition.

Stock code: CM000970
£5,250
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): James I (1603 - 1625)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: mm. thistle, 1603 – 1604
Type First issue
Ref. no: FRC II/III; S 3643

Obv. King crowned holding sword in right hand on heavily caparisoned horse right, 'IACOBVS D' G' ANG' SCO' FRAN' ET HIB' REX'. Rev. Royal Arms, square topped and garnished, 'EXVRGAT DEVS DISSIPENTVR INIMICI', (let god arise and let his enemies be scattered).
43mm, 29.83g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, attractively toned, small scratch over horse's back and to left of shield.

Although this piece has a couple of marks on each side, it is otherwise in exceptionally good condition and due to the piece's rarity these minor defects detract really very little. The coin is well struck with a light grey toning, the details in the king's face, horse and arms on the rev. are exceptionally sharp making for a very attractive and very rare large silver coin of this first Stuart monarch. The type was only issued for a few months over 1603 and 4 because it was decides to phrase James's titles slightly differently - from 'King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland' to 'King of Great Britain, France and Ireland' in order to stress the unity of the two crowns. Consequently, not only is it exceptionally good condition but also a rare issue which add up up to make it a very desirable coin.

England, Commonwealth, Silver Crown, 1653.

Stock code: CM000971
£7,500
Country: England, Commonwealth
King (reign): Commonwealth (1649 - 1660)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: 1653
Type Only issue
Ref. no: ESC 3; N2721; S 3214

Obv. English shield (Cross of St. George) within laurel and palm wreath, 'THE COMONWEALTH OF ENGLAND' outer beaded circle surrounding both sides. Rev. English and Irish shield, value 'V' with stops above within beaded circle, date above, 'GOD WITH VS'.
43mm, 29.46g. EF - Extremely Fine or better – well struck, sharp details and wonderful lustre with grey toning.

Outstanding condition piece - no wear, no weakness (all cross-hatching in both Crosses of St. George can be seen which is so unusual!) and attractively toned with a subdued lustre. Very rare in such good condition. Also very interesting – for the first time we see the legends in English rather than Latin and also for the first time no monarch's head! This was only going to last some seven more years until the 'Restitution' and the restoration of the old style – Latin and Kings.

England, Richard II gold Noble struck at London circa 1385.

Stock code: CM000973
£6,000
Country: England, Medieval
King (reign): Richard II (1377 - 1399)
Denomination/metal: Gold Noble
Date/mint mark: mm. cross pattee; 1377 - 1399
Type Second Issue (French Titles omitted), Type 2b.
Ref. no: Schneider 150 var; N 1304; S 1655.

Obv. King in ship holding shield of Royal Arms and sword, Ropes – 3/1, saltire stops, Slipped trefoil above sail, 'RICARD' DEI GRA' REX ANGL DNS hYB' S AQT' . Rev. Cross fleureee with 'R' in centre and crowned lions 'passant guardant' in angles, 'Ih'C AVTEM TRANSIENS PER MEDIV ILLORVM' IBAT' (But Jesus, passing through the midst of them, went on his way)
34mm, 7.64g. GVF - Good Very Fine or better, attractively toned

Very good example of these scarce nobles of Richard II. Virtually no wear - probably an field find – it shows signs of minor superficial scuffs from being against soil particles in the ground. What is particularly interesting in this piece is that it reveals that the obverse die was rusty when the coin was struck (small pimples in the field reflecting the pitting on the die face). This can only mean that it was used a few years after being made. There is no overall, systematic classifications of the gold coins of Richard II although Web-Ware is working on one. Consequently it is not yet possible to say when in Richard's reign this coin was struck – other than to say that as the obverse die rusted which would have taken some time, not at the beginning of his reign. Richard II, born in 1367, was the son of Edward, the Black Prince and Joan, the Fair Maid of Kent. Richard was but ten years old when he succeeded his grandfather, Edward III; England was ruled by a council under the leadership of John of Gaunt, and Richard was tutored by Sir Simon Burley. Contemporary writers, even those less sympathetic to the king, agreed that Richard was a "most beautiful king", though with a "face which was white, rounded and feminine", implying he lacked manliness. He was athletic and tall; when his tomb was opened in 1871 he was found to be six feet tall. He was also intelligent and well read, and when agitated he had a tendency to stammer. While the Westminster Abbey portrait probably shows a good similarity of the king, the Wilton Diptych portrays the king as significantly younger than he was at the time; it must be assumed that he had a beard by this point. Religiously, he was orthodox, and particularly towards the end of his reign he became a strong opponent of the Lollard heresy. He was particularly devoted to the cult of Edward the Confessor, and around 1395 he had his own arms impaled with the mythical arms of the Confessor. Though not a warrior king like his grandfather, Richard nevertheless enjoyed tournaments, as well as hunting.

England, Henry VI. Gold Noble, struck at London, circa 1425. Pristine condition!

Stock code: CM000972
£4,000
Country: England
King (reign): Henry VI (1422 - 1461)
Denomination/metal: Gold Noble
Date/mint mark: mm. lis on revese, 1422 – 1430
Type London Mint, Annulet Issue.
Ref. no: N 1414; S 1799

Obv. King in ship holding shield of Royal Arms and sword, annulet by sword arm, lis after name, trefoil stops, 'HENRIC DI GRA REX ANGL Z FRANC DNS hYB'. Rev. Cross fleureee with 'h' in centre and crowned lions 'passant guardant' in angles, annulet in first spandrel, mullet after IhC, 'Ih'C AVT TRANSIENS PER MEDIVM ILLORV' IBAT' (But Jesus, passing through the midst of them, went on his way).
33mm, 6.96g. EF - Extremely Fine, a little double struck on shield making details unclear, rev. superb.

Although the obverse is slightly double struck this is a superb coin. It has seen no wear and the obverse is a splendid representation of a medieval king and English sea-power with just the Royal Arms a little indistinct. All the other details are beautifully crisp and clear, especially the ornate Gothic cross on the reverse, and is thus so rare and a beautiful early fifteenth century work of art! Henry was a child of only nine months when he came to the throne, thus making him the youngest person ever to succeed to the English throne. Two months later, on 21 October 1422, he became King of France upon his grandfather Charles VI's death in agreement with the terms of the Treaty of Troyes in 1420. His mother, Catherine of Valois, was then 20 years old and, as Charles VI's daughter, was viewed with considerable suspicion! His father's brothers were appointed regents until he came of age and this particular coin was struck under the regency of John Duke of Bedford.

England, Edward III. Pre-treaty Gold Noble, 1354 - 1361 (ex Lockett).

Stock code: CM000962
£7,250
Country: England, Medieval
King (reign): Edward III (1327 - 1377)
Denomination/metal: Gold Noble
Date/mint mark: mm. cross 3 on rev.; 1354 - 1361.
Type Pre Treaty, Series 'G'.
Ref. no: N 1180; S 1490

Obv. King standing in antique ship holding sword and shield, ship's rigging with three ropes to left, and one to right, ornaments on top line of hull , French title, annulet before first D in Edward, 'EDWARD. DEI. GRA. REX. AGL. Z FRANC. D. hy'B'. Rev. Small 'E' in central compartment with trefoils on angles, upon ornate cross fleurdelisee, crown over lion in each angle, all within beaded and linear tressure of eight arcs, fleurs in spandrels, initial mark cross pattée, annulet stops, '+IhC. AVTEM. TRAnCIEnS. P. MEDIVM. ILLORVM. IBAT', (But Jusus, passing in the midst of them, went His way).
33mm, 7.68g. AEF - About Extremely Fine, well struck with sharp detail.

Very attractive and quintessential medieval coin and from the most blue-blooded provenance - the Locket collection sold in 1956. Beautiful condition – well struck with little to no wear. A very desirable large medieval gold coin from the late 1350s. Edward still claims France in the obverse legend. However, negotiations with France for peace were about to happen at the Treaty of Bretigni in 1360, and anxious to keep the negotiated trading going between the two countries, Edward would drop this claim lest it upset the French. However, after ten years in 1370, he resumed his claim and France is proclaimed as his on subsequent English coins - for more than three centuries to come!

England, Spectacular Gold Pound of Elizabeth I, struck between 1595 & 1598.

Stock code: CM000963
£18,000
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603)
Denomination/metal: Gold Pound
Date/mint mark: mm. key over woolpack; 1595 - 1598
Type Sixth issue
Ref. no: Schneider 801; N 2008; S 2534

Obv. Crowned large bust left, wearing elaborate bodice and small ruff, 'ELIZABETH D' G' ANG' FRA' ET HIBER' REGINA'. Rev. Crowned square topped Royal Arms dividing the initials 'ER', 'SCVTVM FIDEI PROTEGET EAM', (The shield of Faith shall protect her).
38mm, 11.08g. GVF - Good Very Fine with no weak areas and sharply defined portrait.

Very spectacular and iconic piece of this well known Tudor Queen. It has seen very little wear and is well struck making a beautifully clear portrait. It is interesting to note that here they are using a previous die made in c1595 and have simply re-engraved the mintmark 'key' over the original mark of 'woolpack'. A pleasing coin – both spectacular and rare. Though Elizabeth followed a largely defensive foreign policy, her reign raised England's status abroad. "She is only a woman, only mistress of half an island," marvelled Pope Sixtus V, "and yet she makes herself feared by Spain, by France, by the Empire, by all". Under Elizabeth, England gained a new self-confidence and sense of sovereignty, as Christendom fragmented. Elizabeth was the first Tudor to recognise that a monarch ruled by popular consent. She therefore always worked with parliament and advisers she could trust to tell her the truth—a style of government that her Stuart successors failed to follow.

England, William & Mary. Elephant & castle Five Guineas, 1691.

Stock code: CM000964
£12,000
Country: England, Orange
King (reign): William and Mary (1688 - 1694)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guineas, Five
Date/mint mark: 1691
Type Elephant & Castle issue
Ref. no: MCE 137; S 3423

Obv. Laureate, conjoined busts right, Elephant & Casle mark below, 'GVLIELMVS ET MARIA DEI GRATIA'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms (with Lion of Orange in pretence) in rococo garnishing, 'MAG BR FR ET HIB REX ET REGINA'.
37mm, 41.72g. GVF - Good Very Fine, small mark on edge.

Spectacular large gold coin of William & Mary bearing the 'Elephant & Castle mark meaning that the gold had come from Africa. The 'Elephant' Mark below the monarch's portrait denotes gold Supplied by the Royal African Company. The 'Royal African Company' was founded in 1660 as 'The Company of Royal Adventurers Trading to Africa' by Charles II, who was restored to the throne in that year. The Company ensured profits by exercising a monopoly on the trade from the West African coast. It enforced this trade monopoly by seizing other English merchant ships who tried to trade illegally with the locals. The original company collapsed in 1667 when England lost the Second Anglo-Dutch war, which the company had helped to provoke by attacking nearby Dutch merchant outposts. Re-Emerging in 1672, the Company merged with the Gambian Merchants Company to form the 'Royal African Company'. In addition to mining gold and silver, the Company's most important trade 'good' was in human beings. Manufactured goods were traded with local chieftains in return for captured fellow Africans, who were transported across the Atlantic to supply the new world with cheap labour. Millions of Africans were traded this way between 1672 and the end of the company's involvement in slaving in 1731.

USA, early Silver Dollar, dated 1799.

Stock code: CM000965
£3,900
Country: United States of America
King (reign): Republic
Denomination/metal: Silver Dollar
Date/mint mark: 1799
Type Draped Bust
Ref. no: Bowers/Borchardt 164; Bolender 17

Obv. Draped bust of Liberty left, with long hair and thirteen stars around, 'LIBERTY'. Rev. American eagle holding olive branch and sheaf of arrows, with US arms on its breast and ribbon inscribed 'E PLVRIBVS VNVM', thirteen stars above under clouds, around – 'UNITED STATES OF AMERICA'.
40mm, 26.81g. GVF - Good Very Fine or better, attractively toned.

The first American silver dollar was only issued in 1794 and this type with the US arms in 1798. These early US silver dollars were issued in very small quantities and now the collecting population of that country is the biggest in the world – both numerically and financially! Consequently this is a coin always in demand. This particular piece, although not pristine, is a very good example with an attractive grey toning and high eye appeal.

England, Charles I Silver 'Declaration' Crown issued at Oxford in 1643.

Stock code: CM000938
£4,250
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: 1643
Type Provincial Issue (Oxford).
Ref. no: S 2946a

Obv. Shrewsbury horseman' - Charles, crowned and in full armour with sword in right hand, riding left, plumes behind, 'CAROLVS DG MAG BRIT FRAN ET HIBER REX'. Rev. Three plumes over ' 'RELIG. PROT. LEG. ANG. LIBER. PAR.' (The Religion of the Protestants, The Laws of England the Liberty of Parliament). And around 'EXVRGAT: DEUS: DISSIPENTVR: INIMICI:', (Let God arise and his enemies be scattered).
43mm, 29.16g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck and nicely patinated.

An outstanding example giving more detail than ever is normally seen in these provincial mint issues. Very rare to find in such good condition – these coins were struck in makeshift conditions – quickly and carelessly to get coin out to pay the troops – only the weight was important. This is a superb specimen in that it is strongly and centrally struck and also has a beautiful old grey to it and is one of the best portraits seen. When the Civil War began in 1642, the Tower mint fell into the hands of Parliament and Charles was forced to open a mints in Royalist held western England at Shrewsbury, Bristol and Oxford (1642 -1646). In September 1642 he made his famous 'Declaration' promising to uphold the Protestant Religion, the Laws of England and the Liberty of Parliament. This declaration in Latin is displayed on these western mint coins giving them the name of Declaration pieces.

England, Commonwealth gold Unite (20/-), dated 1651.

Stock code: CM000937
£13,500
Country: England, Commonwealth
King (reign): Commonwealth (1649 - 1660)
Denomination/metal: Gold Shillings, Twenty (Unite)
Date/mint mark: 1651
Type Issue under Protectorship of Oliver Cromwell
Ref. no: S 3208

Obv. Cross of St. George of England in palm and laurel wreath, 'The Commonwealth of England'. Rev. Arms of England and Ireland conjoined, denomination 'XX' above, 'GOD WITH US'.
33mm, 9.04g. EF - Extremely Fine or better, well struck on a large flan

Outstanding condition piece – no wear and with traces of original mint lustre. Very rare in such good condition. The obverse die has been harshly cleaned which gives rise to 'upstanding' striations in the obverse fields of the coin – this does not detract in any way to the value of the coin – but instead gives it added interest as it is an original feature. Also very interesting – for the first time we see the legends in English rather than Latin and also for the first time no monarch's head! This was only going to last some eight more years until the 'Restitution' and the restoration of the old style – Latin and Kings.

Anglo-Saxon England, Aethelstan. Silver 'portrait' Penny, struck at London in the early 930s.

Stock code: CM000946
£4,150
Country: England, Anglo-Saxon
King (reign): Æthelstan, 924 – 939
Denomination/metal: Silver Penny
Date/mint mark: London, early 930s
Type London Mint
Ref. no: N 675; S 1095

Obv. Draped and crowned bust right, 'AEDELSTAN REX'. Rev. Small cross pattee in centre, 'LIOFHELM MO LONDCI' (Liofhelm at London).
21mm, 1.55g. GVF - gVF, well struck and attractively toned.

Rare portrait penny of the Saxon king Æthelstan who claimed dominion over all England and even rarer as it the mint is named on the reverse – London. This coin is about as struck but the portrait, as so often, is a little crudely struck. Early in Æthelstan's reign, different styles of coin were issued in each region, but after he conquered York and received the submission of the other British kings, he issued a new coinage, known as the 'Circumscription Cross' type - King of all Britain. In the early 930s a new coinage was issued, the 'crowned-bust' type, with the king shown for the first time wearing a crown with three points. This was eventually issued in all regions apart from Mercia, which showed its independence of mind by issuing coins without a ruler portrait, suggesting that any Mercian affection for a West Saxon king brought up among them quickly declined.

England, Edward III. Gold Half-Noble, 'Treaty Period', struck at Calais 1363 – 1369.

Stock code: CM000947
£3,900
Country: England, Medieval
King (reign): Edward III (1327 - 1377)
Denomination/metal: Gold Noble, Half
Date/mint mark: mm. cross pattee; Calais, 1363 - 1369
Type Fourth coinage, Treaty Period, Calais Mint.
Ref. no: N 1240; S 1508

Obv. King in antique ship with flag on stern (thus denoting it as struck in Calais) holding shield of Royal Arms and sword, 'EDWARD DEI G REX ANGL D HYB Z AQT'. Rev. Cross 'fleurdelise' with crowned leopards in angles, 'C' in centre, all within tressure of eight arches, lis in outer angles, 'DOMINE NE IN FVRORE TVO ARGVAS ME' (Oh Lord! Rebuke me not in Thy anger).
65mm, 3.83g. GVF - Good Very Fine or better, well struck with crisp detail but minor 'scrapes' suggesting it is a 'field find'.

Very good example of a Half-Noble struck in the rarer mint of Calais. Although it is most likely a 'field-find' exhibiting minor scrapes, it is well struck and a good examples of this English coin struck in France. There is an interesting aspect to this coin for unlike most other English coins of the period, Edward has dropped his claim to France in the obverse legend. This is because after negotiations with France for peace which led to the Treaty of Bretigni in 1360, and anxious to keep the negotiated trading going between the two countries, Edward dropped his claim lest it upset the French. However, after ten years, in 1370 he resumed his claim - and France is proclaimed as an English possession on subsequent English coins for more than three centuries to come!

England, Edward III. Gold Noble, 'Treaty Period', struck at London 1363 – 1369.

Stock code: CM000948
£5,350
Country: England, Medieval
King (reign): Edward III (1327 - 1377)
Denomination/metal: Gold Noble
Date/mint mark: mm. cross pattee; London, 1363 - 1369
Type Fourth Coinage, Treaty Period, London Mint.
Ref. no: Schneider 86v; N 1231; S 1502

Obv. King in antique ship holding shield of Royal Arms and sword, 'EDWARD DEI GRA REX ANGL DNS HYB Z AQT'. Rev. Cross fleureee with 'E' in centre and crowned lions passant guardant in angles, trefoils in spandrels, 'IhC AVTEM TRANSIENS PER MEDIV ILLORVM IBAT' (But Jesus, passing through the midst of them, went on his way).
33mm, 7.64g. GVF - Good Very Fine or better, well struck with crisp detail on a large flan.

Very good example of this large medieval gold coin. It is well struck on a particularly large flan making not only all the legend visible but also the details and facial features of the king. It is struck from rusty obv. dies which results in the field being a little 'pock-marked'. There is an interesting aspect to this coin for unlike most other English coins of the period, Edward has dropped his claim to France in the obverse legend. This is because after negotiations with France for peace which led to the Treaty of Bretigni in 1360, and anxious to keep the negotiated trading going between the two countries, Edward dropped his claim lest it upset the French. However, after ten years, in 1370 he resumed his claim - and France is proclaimed as an English possession on subsequent English coins for more than three centuries to come!

England, Edward IV (second reign). Gold Angel, 1471. Excessively rare mintmark.

Stock code: CM000950
£6,500
Country: England, House of York
King (reign): Edward IV (1471 - 1483)
Denomination/metal: Gold Angel
Date/mint mark: mm. small cross fitchee/none; 1471
Type Second Reign issue
Ref. no: Schneider 451; B&W Type XII; N 1626; S 2091

Obv. Angel Michael slaying recumbent dragon, 'EDWARD D GRA REX ANGL S FRANC'. Rev. Ancient ship with cross on mast and Royal Arms below, 'E' and * either side, 'PER CRVSE TVA SALVA NOS XPC REDE TOR' (By the cross, save us, oh Christ the Redeemer).
18mm, 5.05g. GVF - Good very Fine, well struck with crisp details.

Excessively rare mintmark – difficult to enumerate the number but less than a hundred known. Edward only issued two gold coins in this his short second reign (Angel and Half-Angel). The Short Cross Fitchee mintmark denotes the first year of issue ie 1471 and only a very small amount were struck. This coin is also very attractive condition with good features to Michael’s face – a rare coin in rarely seen condition and thus very desirable.

England, Henry VI. Gold Noble. Struck at London 1422 – 1430.

Stock code: CM000949
£4,500
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Henry VI (1422 - 1461)
Denomination/metal: Gold Noble
Date/mint mark: mm. lis; 1422 – c1460
Type Annulet Issue.
Ref. no: N 1414; S 1788

Obv. King in antique ship holding shield of Royal Arms and sword, annulet by hand, 'HENRICVS DE GRAC REX ANGL Z FRANC DNS HY'. Rev. Cross 'fleurdelise' with crowned leopards in angles, 'h' in centre, all within tressure of eight arches, lis in outer angles annulets in legend of rev., 'IhC AVT TRANSIENS PER MEDIVM ILLORVM IBAT' (But Jesus, passing through the midst of them, went on his way).
34mm, 7g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, well struck apart from one small area, large flan.

Particularly good specimen, well struck with one small weak area, otherwise beautifully crisp and clear and is thus so rare and a beautiful early fifteenth century work of art! Pretty coin! Henry was a child of only nine months when he came to the throne, thus making him the youngest person ever to succeed to the English throne. Two months later, on 21 October 1422, he became King of France upon his grandfather Charles VI's death in agreement with the Treaty of Troyes in 1420. His mother, Catherine of Valois, was then 20 years old and, as Charles VI's daughter, was viewed with considerable suspicion! His father's brothers were appointed regents until he came of age and this particular coin was struck under the regency of John Duke of Bedford.

England, Charles I. Huge Silver Half-Pound, issued at Oxford in 1643.

Stock code: CM000951
£4,900
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Pound, Half
Date/mint mark: mm. plume; 1643
Type Provisional issue – Oxford; Oxford plume obv., Shrewsbury horseman
Ref. no: Brooker -; N 2404; S 2495a

Obv. Charles riding horse left over arms on ground, holding sword in right hand, plume behind, 'CAROLVS D G MAGN BRIT FRAN ET HIB REX'. Rev. Declaration 'RELIG PROT LEG ANG LIBER PAR' (Protestant Religion. Laws of England, Freedom of Parliament) between three plumes and denomination (X) above and date below, 'EXVRGAT DEVS DISSIPENTVR INIMICI' (Let God arise, let his enemies be scattered).
50mm, 29.79g. VF - Very Fine or better, Obv. Slightly off centre, minor edge 'percussion' split at 9 o' clock.

Very rare to find in such good condition – these huge coins often split their flans when struck (which this has a little) and due to their large weight quickly wore each other down when carried in a money bag. So as well as being a rare, it is doubly rare to find one in so well struck and in such good condition. When the Civil War began in 1642, the Tower mint fell into the hands of Parliament and Charles was forced to open a mints in Royalist held western England at Shrewsbury and Oxford (1642 - 1646). In September 1642 he made his famous 'Declaration' promising to uphold the Protestant Religion, the Laws of England and the Liberty of Parliament. This declaration in Latin is displayed on these western mint coins giving them the name of 'Declaration pieces'. Furthermore, Charles was running out of gold but had a ready supply of silver mainly from South Wales and thus through necessity, began to issue gold denominations in silver. This gave rise to this huge unwieldy series of pounds and half-pounds, the largest British silver current coin ever issued. Very rare and beautiful Civil War coin with a local interest - and very large!