View Basket and Checkout
Your basket is empty
Show:
Sort:
Showing 1- 31 of 31 results

Filter your results

filter results by category

Filter by Keyword

latest stock
I'm sorry, this item is no longer available - you may be interested in these similar items

England - Charles I, Gold Triple Unite, minted Oxford during the Civil War, 1642

Stock code: CM000481X
£98,500
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Gold Pounds, Three (Triple Unite)
Date/mint mark: 1642
Type Oxford Mint, 'Declaration'
Ref. no: Schneider 286; N 2381; S 2724

Obv. Half length tall figure of Charles to left, wearing crown and full armour holding a sword and an olive branch. Plumes behind, 'CAROLVS DG MAG BRIT FRAN ET HI REX'. Rev. Declaration in a three line scroll, 'RELIG PROT / LEG ANG / LIBER PAR' (Protestant Religion, Laws of England, Liberty of Parliament), three plumes above with mark of value, date below; around 'EXVRGAT DEVS DISSIPENTVR INIMICI' (Let God arise and let the enemy be scattered).
46mm, 27g. GVF - Good Very Fine, strongly struck

TheTripleUnite, valued atsixty shillings, 60/-or three pounds, was the highestEnglishdenomination to be produced. It was struck at the Oxford Mint set up during the first English Civil War of 1642-6 and issued between January and March of 1642 at the hurriedly set up mint at New Inn Hall in Oxford. This huge coin was issued, at least in part, for use as gifts to those whom the King wished to 'cement' to his side in the Civil War. Thus he obverse design for the coin features an armoured bust of Charles I, with broadsword raised, and yet in visual dichotomy he bears an olive branch clutched over his heart. Charles was visually appealing to either nature of the benefactor he was seeking to entice. The bust on this coin is very hawkish which is the earliest type, later he had it changed to a more benevolent softer style. On the reverse he put his famous declaration – uttered in 1642 when he swore to to uphold the Protestant Religion, the laws of England and the freedom of Parliament. Very rare and spectacular coin!

Great Britain - 1739 AD Guineas, Two - (AEF) Milled, Gold

Stock code: CM000323X
£3,900
Country: Great Britain
King (reign): George II (1723 - 1760)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guineas, Two
Type: Milled Intermediate, laureate head
Ref. no: Schneider 576; S 3668

Obv. Laureate, draped bust left. Rev. Crowned, garnished Royal Arms – Great Britain, France, Ireland and Hanover.
32mm, 16.71g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, reverse better. Lustre in protected areas of the field, clean coin

Handsome large gold coin of George II, little wear making it a pleasing and desirable coin. George was the last British monarch born outside Great Britain and was born and brought up in Northern Germany. As king from 1727, George exercised little control over British domestic policy, which was largely controlled by Great Britain's parliament. As elector, he spent 12 summers in Hanover, where he had more direct control over government policy. He had a difficult relationship with his eldest son, Frederick , who supported the parliamentary opposition. During the War of the Austrian Succession, George participated at the Battle of Dettingen in 1743, and thus became the last British monarch to lead an army into battle. In 1745, supporters of the Stuart and Catholic claimant to the British throne failed to depose George in the last of the Jacobite rebellions. Frederick died unexpectedly in 1751, leaving George's grandson, George III , as heir apparent and ultimately king.

England, Edward VI 'Fine Silver Crown' dated 1551.

Stock code: CM000980
£5,200
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Edward VI (1547 - 1553)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: mm. Y; 1551
Type First Issue
Ref. no: N 1933; S 2478

Obv. Edward, crowned and in full armour holding sword, riding right on full caparisoned war-horse, 'EDWARD VI D G AGL FRANC Z HIBER REX'. Rev. Cross fourchee on Royal Arms, 'POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM', (I have made God my helper).
41mm, 30.66g. GVF - Good Very Fine, good even grey toning.

Some superficial wear, but well struck so all main features of king and horse are clearly discernible – very attractive even grey toning. This coin is particularly interesting in that it claims two 'firsts' – this is the first silver coin of this size, ie. a crown, to be issued and it is the first time an English silver coin bears the date in Arabic numerals! The coin is rare and as a type was only issued for three years – 1551, 52 and 53. The 'Y' mintmark was chosen as the letter was the surname initial of the Under-Treasurer 'Sir John Yorke'.

Great Britain, George I Gold Two Guineas, 1726

Stock code: CM000942
£6,500
Country: Great Britain
King (reign): George I (1714 - 1727)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guineas, Two
Date/mint mark: 1726

Ref. no: S 3627, Schneider 543, M.C.E. 244

Obv. Laureate head r., GEORGIVS. D.G. M. BR. FR. ET. HIB REX. F. D. toothed broder surrounding. Rev. Crowned cruciform emblematic shields, sceptres in angles, garter star at centre, BRVN ET.L.DVC.S.R.I.A.TH. ET. EL. Toothed border surrounding edge, obliquely grained
31mm, 1.8g. EF - Extremely fine, flecking and hairlines evident both sides, with considerable mint brilliance, hairline scratch on eyelid, otherwise extremely fine

England, Charles II silver Shilling 1663.

Stock code: CM001105
£1,800
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles II (1660 - 1685)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: 1663
Type First Bust
Ref. no: ESC 1022; S 3371.

Obv. Laurete, draped bust of Charles right, 'CAROLVS II DEI GRATIA'. Rev. Cruciform Royal Arms with entwined 'C's in angles and Garter Cross in centre, 'MAG BR FRA ET HIB REX'.
25mm, 6.02g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, attractive toning with traces of original lustre, small edge nick on rev. rim.

Very pretty example – attractively toned, with considerable original lustre

Scotland, Charles I silver twelve-shillings, Intermediate Issue 1637 – 1642.

Stock code: CM001103
£375
Country: Scotland King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shillings, Twelve
Type Third Coinage, Intermediate Issue
Ref. no: S 5559.

Obv. Crowned bust left, denomination 'XII' behind, CAR D G MAG BRITAN FR ET HIB REX'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms dividing crowned 'CR', small thistle above crown, QVE DEVS CONIVNXIT NEMO SEPARET' (What God hath joined together let no man put asunder).
31mm, 5.81g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck, weight adjustment marks.

Beautifully detailed bust and good example of this 'Intermediate' issue of superior coins issued while Nicholas Briot was working at the Edinburgh Mint. Charles I had sent the French die engraver up to Edinburgh to sort the coinage out in 1635 as 'Master of the Scottish Mint' and a few years later he was joined by his son-in-law John Falconer who eventually succeeded him in 1646. However, this series of coins was engraved either by Briot or Falconer under his father-in-law's direction, in the early years of 1637 – 1642.

Scotland, James VI silver Ten shillings 1582.

Stock code: CM001101
£5,000
Country: Scotland King (reign): James VI (1567 - 1625)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shillings, Ten
Date/mint mark: 1582
Type Fourth Coinage
Ref. no: S 5490.

Obv. Crowned half bust of James left, holding sword in right hand, 'IACOBVS 6 DEI GRATIA REX SCOTORVM'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms dividing 'IR' and denomination 'X S', 'HONOR REGIS IVDICIVM DILIGIT', (The king's power loveth judgement).
31mm, 7.79g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck and nicely toned.

Outstanding ten shillings of this young Scottish king – beautiful detail in facial features and bust. Rare, spectacular with a very good provenances (Dakers, Langford and Hird collections) - thus desirable and much rarer than the larger 30 shillings piece ! King of Scotland from 1567 as a one year old and England (as James I) from 1603. The son of Mary Queen of Scots and her second husband, Lord Darnley, he succeeded to the Scottish throne on the enforced abdication of his mother and assumed power in 1583, and this coin was issued just before his majority when he was only seventeen. James's childhood and adolescence were unhappy, abnormal, and precarious; he had various guardians, whose treatment of him differed widely. His education, although thorough, was weighted with Presbyterian and Calvinist political doctrine, and his character – highly intelligent and sensitive, but also fundamentally shallow, vain, and exhibitionist – reacted violently to this. However, initially he established a strong centralized authority, and in 1589 married Anne of Denmark.

Scotland, James VI silver 'Balance' Half-merk 1591.

Stock code: CM001102
£1,150
Country: Scotland King (reign): James VI (1567 - 1625)
Denomination/metal: Silver Merk, Half
Date/mint mark: 1591
Type Sixth Coinage
Ref. no: S 5491.

Obv. Crowned shield between two thistles, 'IACOBVS 6 D G R SCOT0RVM'. Rev. Pair of scales with sword behind, 'HIS DIFFERT REGE TYRANNVS', (In these a tyrant differs from a king).
29mm, 4.52g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck and attractive toning.

Well struck on a large flan and attractively patinated. The coin was worth six shillings and eight pence Scots – the coins of James VI's reign are considered to have the most beautiful designs and most varied legends of all Scottish coins. After the Union of the Crowns of 1603, Scottish gold and silver coins closely resembled their English counterparts.

Ireland Great Rebellion, silver Halfcrown. 'Ormonde money' issued 1643 – 1644.

Stock code: CM001104
£1,000
Country: England, Stuart King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown, Half
Date/mint mark: 1643-1644
Type Lords Justices' issue ('Ormonde')
Ref. no: S 6545.

Obv. Crown over large 'CR' Rev. large denomination 'IIS VID'
35mm, 14.95g. AVF - About very Fine, lightly toned.

Particularly good example of this 'Ormonde' issue and thus rare. During the period of the Great Rebellion in Ireland and the English Civil War a number of crudely made local coinages were produced in Ireland, mostly in Dublin. These coinage were almost exclusively of silver plate cut and struck into a number of denominations with simple patterns including often their weight or value. Most common among these issues is the 'Ormond Money' issued by the Lord Justice the Earl of Ormond in about 1642-1645 (James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde KG, PC (1610–1688) was an Anglo-Irish statesman and soldier, known as Earl of Ormonde from 1634 to 1642 and Marquess of Ormonde from 1642 to 1661. His friend, the 1st Earl of Strafford, caused him to be appointed the commander of the Cavalier forces in Ireland. 1641 to 1647, he led the fighting against the Irish Catholic Confederation. 1649 to 1650 he led the Royalist forces fighting against Cromwell In the 1650s he fled Ireland to exile in Europe with Charles II

Scotland, David II silver half-groat issued at Edinburgh 1357 – 1367.

Stock code: CM001099
£1,200
Country: Scotland
King (reign): David II (1329 - 1371)
Denomination/metal: Silver Groat, Half
Date/mint mark: 1357 -1367
Type Second Coinage, Old bust, Edinburgh mint
Ref. no: S 5110.

Obv. Large crowned 'old' bust left, DAVID DEI GRACIA REX SCOTVRVM'. Rev. Long cross potent, mullets in angles, small 'D' in one quarter, outer, 'DEVS PROTECTOR MEVS ' (God is my protector) inner, 'VILLA EDINGVRGH'.
24mm, 2g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, well struck with attractive iridescent toning.

Beautiful little coin – strong portrait and legend, attractively patinated. Rare thus. David was married at the age of 4 to Joan the 7 year old daughter of Edward II. He succeeded to the throne the following year on the death of his father Robert I and was crowned at Scone in 1331. The regency was in the hands of Thomas Randolph of Moray until he and David were overthrown in 1332 by Edward Balliol (son of John Balliol) at the Battle of Dupplin Moor near Perth. David was restored to the throne the following year but again overthrown when Balliol returned with Edward III and defeated the Scots at Halidon hill. David and Joan fled to France where they were guests of King Phillip VI. In 1341 the Scottish nobles under Robert Stewart gained the upper hand and David and Joan were able to return to Scotland and were restored to the throne. Five years later in 1346 David attacked England in support of France while Edward III was away fighting in France. The Scots were defeated at Nevillie’s Cross near Durham where David was injured and taken prisoner. He was held captive in England for 11 years until 1357 when under the Treaty of Berwick he was allowed to return to Scotland for a ransom of 100,000 merks ‘A King’s Ransom’. The full amount was never paid and it was in this period that this coin was issued.

Scotland, James VI silver Thirty shillings 1585.

Stock code: CM001100
£3,250
Country: Scotland King (reign): James VI (1567 - 1625)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shillings, Thirty
Date/mint mark: 1585
Type Fourth Coinage
Ref. no: S 5487.

Obv. Crowned half bust of James left, holding sword in right hand, 'IACOBVS 6 DEI GRATIA REX SCOTORVM'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms dividing 'IR' and denomination 'XXX S', 'HONOR REGIS IVDICIVM DILIGIT', (The king's power loveth judgement).
36mm, 22.43g. GVF - Good Very Fine, rev. a little less and struck slightly off centre. Nicely toned.

Superb large coin of this young Scottish king – beautiful detail in facial features and bust. Rare, spectacular and desirable ! King of Scotland from 1567 as a one year old and England (as James I) from 1603. The son of Mary Queen of Scots and her second husband, Lord Darnley, he succeeded to the Scottish throne on the enforced abdication of his mother and assumed power in 1583, and this coin was issued just after this when he was nineteen. James's childhood and adolescence were unhappy, abnormal, and precarious; he had various guardians, whose treatment of him differed widely. His education, although thorough, was weighted with Presbyterian and Calvinist political doctrine, and his character – highly intelligent and sensitive, but also fundamentally shallow, vain, and exhibitionist – reacted violently to this. However, initially he established a strong centralized authority, and in 1589 married Anne of Denmark.

Philip & Mary silver shilling 1554. (Only English issue bearing Spanish king).

Stock code: CM000780
£5,500
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Philip and Mary (1554 - 1558)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: 1554
Type English Titles only.
Ref. no: S 2501; N 1968

Obv. Busts of Philip and Mary vis-a-vis, crown dividing date above, 'PHILIP ET MARIA D G REX ET REGINA ANGL'. Rev. Royal Arms with Spanish arms in first quarter, 'POSVIMUS DEVM ADJVTOREM NOSTRVM' (We have made God our helper).
31mm, 4.96g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, well struck and marvellously toned.

When Queen Mary married Philip II of Spain as consort he became king which meant technically he ruled England as the senior Royal (as a man). For nearly four years Philip was not only king of Spain but also king of England and with Mary he tried to bring the kingdom back into the Catholic fold - from which Mary's father, Henry VIII had 'wrenched' it. Struck for only two years this coin is not only rare but a tremendously interesting token of the religious struggle which was going on at this time. It is also a very good example as it is very difficult to find both portraits well struck up (often one is quite weak). Also all the peripheral legend on each side is clear and legible – again difficult to find and with seen little wear and with superb toning making this example an extremely desirable coin.

Scotland, Splendid gold Rider (100/- Scots) dated 1594.

Stock code: CM000779
£6,500
Country: Scotland
King (reign): James VI (1567 - 1625)
Denomination/metal: Gold Shillings, 100
Date/mint mark: 1594
Type Seventh issue.
Ref. no: S 5458

Obv. James, in full armour holding sword and orb, riding a fully caparisoned horse right, 'IACOBVS 6 D G R SCOTORVM'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms, 'SPERO MELIORA' ( I hope hope better things).
28mm, 4.96g. AVF - Almost Very Fine, well struck.

Very splendid Scottish coin, nicknamed the 'rider' this coin was worth 100 shillings Scots This coin was issued just before James became King of England and was brought south by James in 1603 and was made legal tender in England and Wales as 10 shillings. The coinage of James VI is a very large and varied issue – more so than any other Scottish monarch, many new and innovatively designed pieces were introduced during this reign as well as several new denominations. After he inherited the English throne as James I in 1603 the Scottish monetary system was tied to the English system at a rate of 12:1 which was continued until the union of the two crowns as the United Kingdom under Anne in 1707, at which point the Scottish coinage was called in.

England, Charles II hammered silver Halfcrown, 'first issue' c1661.

Stock code: CM000782
£7,000
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles II (1660 - 1685)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown, Half
Date/mint mark: mm. crown, 1660 - 1662
Type First Issue
Ref. no: S 3307; N 2759

Obv. Crowned bust of Charles left, long hair and lace collar, no inner circle. 'CAROLVS II DG MAG BRIT FRAN ET HIB REX'. Rev. Royal Arms on Cross moline, no inner circle, 'CHRISTO AVSPICE REGNO' (I reign under the auspice of Christ).
34mm, 14.94g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, well struck and marvellously toning with blue tinges to lustre.

Beautiful condition – virtually no wear, glorious lustrous blue tinged toning. Only a two year type thus rare and in superb and 'almost impossible to better' condition. This coin has the additional interest in that firstly it it marks the return to Latin from English and the putting back a monarch's head on coins of the realm after Cromwell's Commonwealth. Secondly, it was the last series of hammered coins - for in 1663 the ancient method of striking coins by hand was finally superseded by the 'coin mill'. Coining machinery was installed at the Royal Mint and Blondeau in Cromwell's day and the Roettier brothers engraved dies and for the first time, with a safeguard against clipping, coins were given a grained edge whilst the larger coins were made with an inscribed edge. However, after regaining the throne Charles was very anxious to get coins bearing his image out into circulation – and so he initially set about issuing coins by hand until the coin mills were properly set up and ready to go, producing superior 'milled coins' in early 1663.

England, Charles II silver octagonal shilling 1648, Siege of Pontefract.

Stock code: CM000789
£6,250
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: 1648
Type Pontefract 'Octagonal' Siege piece
Ref. no: S 3151; N 2649

Obv. Crowned legend 'HANC DEVS DEDIT', (God has given this [ie the crown]), CAROL II D G MAG BR F ET HI REX', Charles II king of Great Britain, France and Ireland'. Rev. Castle with a canon poking out of left wall, 'POST MORTEM PATRIS PRO FILIO' (After the death of the father we are for the son).
33mm, 4.42g. VF - Very Fine, nicely toned.

Very interesting siege coin – struck after Charles I had been executed and in the name of his son – who wouldn't actually rule for another 21 years with the 'Restoration of the Monarchy'. In the summer of 1648 the castle at Pontefract was seized by a group of local Royalists as part of a plan to cover the invasion of England by a Scottish army led by the Duke of Hamilton with the aim of releasing King Charles I from the house arrest he was under and re establishing his authority. Its strategic importance had meant that unlik e other castles it had not been demolished when it surrendered after two sieges in 1645. With the defeat of the Scots at the battle of Preston in August the garrison came under close siege. When the Rump Parliament tried and executed the King the beseigers’ called upon the garrison to surrender – they were the only place actually still fighting in the King’s name. The Rump had made it illegal to proclaim a new King, and abolished the office on February 7th but all their actions were those of a junta without any lawful authority of their own. The reaction of the Pontefract garrison was to proclaim the late King’s son as King Charles II, and to continue to hold out in his name. A contemporary report said that “They say they will have a King whatever it cost them.” Within the castle silver siege coins had already been produced in the name of King Charles I, with the motto Dum Spero Spiro (Whilst I breathe I hope). The design of the die suggests the work of a much more competent engraver than that of other siege pieces produced elsewhere. He now produced a new set of dies in the name of King Charles II, and with the motto Post Mortem Patris Pro Filio (After the death of the father we are for the son) as can be seen in this coin. The castle itself finally surrendered on March 24th.

England, Oliver Cromwell silver shilling (proposed !) dated 1658.

Stock code: CM001072
£4,250
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Oliver Cromwell (Lord Protector) (1653 - 1658)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: 1658
Type Proposed Milled Issue.
Ref. no: S 3228.

Obv. Laureate and draped bust left, with die flaw at late stage, legend and toothed border, OLIVAR D GR P ANG SCO HIB & PRO'. Rev. Crowned quartered shield of arms of the Protectorate, date
Above, toothed border 'PAX QVAERITVR BELLO'. (Peace is sought by war)
28mm, 6.08g. UC - Uncirculated, attractive grey toning with a little cabinet friction on highest points.

Superb condition and marvellous patination – would be pristine if not for the very slight cabinet friction on the highest points. Nevertheless, outstanding, desirable and rare. Made from Thomas Simon's coin mills, this series of some of the first machine made coins bearing Oliver Cromwell's portrait were made at the end of Cromwell's life. Authorised in 1656, they were issued in 1657 and 58, they are really patterns and did not generally circulate – however they are interesting in the respect that they indicate that the Lord Protector was 'assuming the purple' and may well have issued coins bearing his portrait with his crowned (!!!) arms had he not died !

England, Elizabeth I gold Pound issued 1594 – 1596. Outstanding example.

Stock code: CM001058
£28,500
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603)
Denomination/metal: Gold Pound
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Woolpack' – May 1594 – Feb. 1596.
Type Third Issue, Crown Coinage.
Ref. no: Schneider 799; N 2008; S 2534.

Obv. Crowned bust left with long hair and intricate bodice, 'ELIZABETH DG ANG' FRA' ET HI' REGINA'. Rev. Crowned and garnished Royal Arms dividing 'ER', SCVTAM FIDEI PROTERET EAM', (The shield of faith shall protect her).
39mm, 11.22g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, well and centrally struck

Superb and outstanding example of a rare coin in a condition almost impossible to better. This rare and large gold coin represents in every way 'Elizabeth Gloriana'. The die work is very good resulting in a marvellous and attractive detail to Elizabeth's portrait – the clarity of her features, the intricacy of her bodice and with no wear, all in sharp definition. This is a gem of a coin and a fantastic contemporary portrait of this iconic Tudor queen.

Gt. Britain, Anne gold Guinea 1714.

Stock code: CM001082
£2,950
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Anne (1702 - 1714)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guinea
Date/mint mark: 1714
Type Post Union Issue.
Ref. no: S 3574.

Obv. Draped bust left, lovelock over right shoulder, 'ANNA DEI GRATIA'. Rev. Royal Arms in cruciform, sceptres in angles, garter star in centre, 'MAG BRI FR ET HIB REG'.
25mm, 8.35g. AEF - About Extremly Fine, rev. Good Extremely Fine.

Good condition piece – traces of original lustre particularly on reverse.

England, Charles I silver hammered Shilling issued between 1636 and 1638.

Stock code: CM001077
£525
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Tun' – 1636 – 38.
Type Tower Mint, Group 'D', Type 3a.
Ref. no: S 2791.

Obv. Crowned, draped bust left, denomination behind, 'CAROLVS D G MA BR FR ET HI REX'. Rev. Oval, garnished Royal Arms, 'CHRISTO AVSPICE REGNO', (I reign under the auspice of Christ).
29mm, 6.07g. VF - Very Fine or better – well struck. No weak areas, lightly toned.

Not rare (as Charles shillings go) but beautiful condition – well struck with all details and legend crisp and clear. At this period hammered coin production did not have very good quality control apart from getting the weight right, but in this piece we see a carefully struck coin with complete legend both sides, good facial features, clear Royal Arms. In short a desirable and uncommon piece.

England, Philip & Mary silver Shilling (1554/5), Superb condition !

Stock code: CM001065
£6,350
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Philip and Mary (1554 - 1558)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: Undated, but struck 1554/5.
Type Undated, Full Titles.
Ref. no: N1967; S 2498.

Obv. Large crown over busts of Philip and Mary vis a vis, no date. 'PHILIP ET MARIA D G R ANG FR NEAP PR HISP'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms of Spain and England. Denomination (XII) by crown, 'POSVIMVS DEVM ADIVTOREM NOSTRVM', (We have made god our helper).
31mm, 5.84g. EF - Extremely Fine, well struck and darkly toned.

This coin is an exceptionally good specimen as both portraits of Philip and Mary are well struck up (often one is quite weak) and sharply clear regarding the details of their facial features and dress – especially Mary. Also all the peripheral legend on each side is clear and legible – again difficult to find and with the fact that this piece has seen little wear and is also very attractively patinated makes this example a very desirable and exceptional piece – very difficult to better ! When Queen Mary married Philip II of Spain as consort he became king which meant technically he ruled England as the senior Royal (as a man). For nearly four years Philip was not only king of Spain and Naples but also king of England and with Mary he tried to bring the kingdom back into the Catholic fold - from which Mary's father, Henry VIII had 'wrenched' it. Struck for only two years this coin is not only rare but a tremendously interesting token of the religious struggle which was going on at this time.

England, Elizabeth I silver One Testern (1600) – proposed for use in East Indies.

Stock code: CM001069
£4,800
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603)
Denomination/metal: Silver Testern, One
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'O' – 1600 – 01.
Type Portcullis Money
Ref. no: N -; S 2607d.

Obv. Crowned Royal Arms dividing crowned 'ER', 'ELIZABETH D G AN FR ET HI REGINA'. Rev. Crowned Portcullis, 'POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM', (I have made God my helper).
24mm, 3.17g. GVF - Good Very Fine, toned, signs of former crease.

Exceptionally rare and well struck exhibiting little wear and signs of a a small crease. Very important historically - the few known are extraordinarily badly struck and this example shows a good clear portcullis with most of the legend visible. This Portcullis money of One Testern (or 1/8th.dollar) was struck at the Tower Mint for the use of the Company of Merchants of London, later to be the East India Company and were taken on their first voyage to the East. They are considered by many to be our first purely colonial issue. They were produced with the intention to compete with the Spanish ""pieces of eight” which was the accepted currency in the East. Like the Spanish coins they were hoping to replace, they were issued in denominations of one, two, four and eight testerns and their purpose was to consolidate Britain's influence in the economic and commercial struggle with other 'would be' colonisers such as the Spanish and Dutch. Unfortunately, the coins were not a success as they were not popular with traders in the East, who were suspicious of these new strange looking coins – preferring the accepted then established Spanish 'coins of trade'. There are only thought to be less than two hundred surviving coins (of all four denoms.) of which many are in museums.

England, Elizabeth I silver 'milled' Halfcrown of 1601

Stock code: CM001068
£6,300
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown, Half
Date/mint mark: Mintmark '1' – 1601
Type Seventh issue.
Ref. no: N 2013; S 2583.

Obv. Crowned bust left with intricate bodice, 'ELIZABETH D G ANG FRA ET HIBER REGINA'. Rev. Royal Arms on cross fourchee, 'POSVI DEVM ADIVTOREM MEVM', (I have made God my helper)
35mm, 14.9g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, reverse better.

This coin is well struck and very nicely patinated , especially on the reverse. The die work is very good and with this strong strike has resulted in marvellous and attractive detail to Elizabeth's portrait – the clarity of her features, the intricacy of her bodice and with little wear, all in sharp definition. This is a very good example and a fantastic contemporary portrait of this iconic Tudor queen.

England, Philip & Mary silver Shilling 1554, very good condition !

Stock code: CM001089
£2,250
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Philip and Mary (1554 - 1558)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: 1554
Type Dated, Full Titles
Ref. no: N 1967; S 2500.

Obv. Large crown over busts of Philip and Mary vis a vis, date. 'PHILIP ET MARIA D G R ANG FR NEAP PR HISP'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms of Spain and England. Denomination (XII) by crown, 'POSVIMVS DEVM ADIVTOREM NOSTRVM', (We have made god our helper).
30mm, 5.93g. GVF - Good Very Fine, pretty good strike.

Although it has seen a little wear, this coin is a very good specimen as both portraits of Philip and Mary are well struck up (often one is quite weak) and sharply clear regarding the details of their facial features and dress. Also all the peripheral legend on each side is mostly clear and legible – again difficult to find and with the fact that this piece is also very attractively patinated makes it a very desirable and exceptional. When Queen Mary married Philip II of Spain as consort he became king which meant technically he ruled England as the senior Royal (as a man). For nearly four years Philip was not only king of Spain and Naples but also king of England and with Mary he tried to bring the kingdom back into the Catholic fold - from which Mary's father, Henry VIII had 'wrenched' it. Struck for only two years this coin is not only rare but a tremendously interesting token of the religious struggle which was going on at this time.

Great Britain, Charles II. Milled Gold Guinea - dated 1679.

Stock code: CM000957
£7,750
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles II (1660 - 1685)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guinea
Date/mint mark: 1679
Type Fourth Bust
Ref. no: MCE 106; S 3344

Obv. Laureate bust right, 'CAROLVS II SEI GRATIA'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms in cruciform, 'C' cypher in centre, sceptres in angles, 'MAG BRI FR ET HIB REG'.
25mm, 8.24g. AEF - About Extremely Fine, strong bust, rev. a little weak.

In 1663 the ancient process of striking coins was given up for good and the Royal mint became totally mechanised under direction of the Roettier brothers whom Charles had brought back with him from the Continent on the Restitution of the Monarchy in 1660. This guinea is one of the new style milled coins and although there is a little weakness in the centre of the reverse, the portrait of Charles is particularly strong. It is thus attractive and therefore desirable.

England, Elizabeth I large gold Sovereign (30 shillings) issued 1592 – 1593. Attractive example.

Stock code: CM001059
£16,750
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603)
Denomination/metal: Gold Sovereign
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Tun' – Feb. 1592 – Jun. 1593.
Type Second issue, Second period.
Ref. no: Schneider 783; N 2003 S 2529.

Obv. Elizabeth, crowned and wearing ceremonial robes, seated facing on throne bearing orb and sceptre, portcullis at her feet, 'ELIZABETH D'G' ANG' FRA' ET HIB' REGINA'. Rev. Royal Arms in centre of Tudor rose, 'A DNO FACTV' EST ISTVDET EST MIRAB' INOCVL' NRS', (This is the Lord's doing and is marvellous in our eyes'.
42mm, 15.32g. GVF - Good Very Fine, a little weak to the right of her chin. Small privy mark (cross) lightly scratched on her right shoulder).

Large, splendid and rare gold Thirty shillings piece of Elizabeth, called a sovereign because it portrays the sovereign in full length. Very good condition although just al little weakly struck at Elizabeth's chin – if it were strong here then the coin would be two to three times this price. Apart from this natural striking weakness it is a very good coin and the detail on the reverse is very crisp and strong.

England, James I gold Unite (20 shillings) issued 1604 – 1605.

Stock code: CM001061
£3,250
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): James VI (1567 - 1625)
Denomination/metal: Gold Shillings, Twenty (Unite)
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Lis' – Nov. 1604 – Jun. 1605.
Type Second Issue.

Obv. Crowned king in full armour right holding orb and sceptre, IACOBVS DG MAG BRIT FRANC ET HIB REX'. Rev. Crowned and garnished Royal Arms dividing 'IR', FACIAM EOS IN GENTEM VNAM'. (I will make them into one nation).
37mm, 9.84g. AVF - About Very Fine, well struck but with a little wear.

Although this coin has seen a little wear, because it was strongly stuck all the main features are still visible and it is still a very attractive piece of this first Stuart monarch of England. Called a 'Unite' because of James's wish to 'unite' the nations of England and Scotland – which sentiment he chose to be the reverse legend of his twenty Shillings piece. This is a concept that is particularly relevant today !

England, Charles I silver Crown, struck during Civil War at Truro 1642 – 1643.

Stock code: CM001063
£1,500
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Rose' – 1642-43.
Type Truro Mint
Ref. no: S 3045.

Obv. King crowned and armoured on horse left, sash flying out, 'CAROLVS D G MAG BRIT FRA ET HI REX'. Rev. Round, garnished Royal Arms, CHRISTO AVSPICE REGNO' (I reign under the auspice of Christ).
42mm, 28.82g. VF - Very Fine, upper bust a little weakly struck

These coins are normally quickly and badly struck but this example exhibits very little wear, a full legend with a very well struck reverse. However the upper bust of Charles is a little weak but the detail in the horse is very good. This coin is a better specimen than the plate coin in 'Coins of England'. When the Civil War began in 1642, the Tower mint fell into the hands of Parliament and Charles was forced to open a mints in Royalist held western England at Shrewsbury, Bristol and Oxford Truro and finally Exeter. (1642 -46). In 1643 the king was already minting coins in Truro and on 4 September, after a siege, Exeter surrendered to Prince Maurice and the city remained in Royalist hands till 9 April 1646. On 3 January 1644 Sir Richard Vyvyan received a Royal Commission to set up a mint in Exeter;

Gt. Britain, Anne gold Five-Guinea 1706.

Stock code: CM001081
£16,750
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Anne (1702 - 1714)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guineas, Five
Date/mint mark: 1706 QVINTO
Type Post Union Issue.
Ref. no: S 3566.

Obv. Draped bust left, lovelock over right shoulder, 'ANNA DEI GRATIA'. Rev. Royal Arms in cruciform, sceptres in angles, garter star in centre, 'MAG BRI FR ET HIB REG'.
38mm, 41.69g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, surface marks.

Large, splendid and attractive coin – first Five-Guineas to be struck after the Act of Union . The Union of English and Scottish Parliaments actually took place on the 1st. of May 1707 – however, it had been agreed by both parliaments in July 1706 so this coin jumps the gun a little by combining the arms of England and Scotland for this date !

England, Philip & Mary silver Sixpence 1554

Stock code: CM001073
£2,200
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Philip and Mary (1554 - 1558)
Denomination/metal: Silver Penny, Six (Sixpence)
Date/mint mark: 1554
Type Dated, Full Titles
Ref. no: N 1970. S 2505.

Obv. Large crown over busts of Philip and Mary vis a vis, date. 'PHILIP ET MARIA D G R ANG FR NEAP PR HISP'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms of Spain and England. Denomination (VI) by crown, 'POSVIMVS DEVM ADIVTOREM NOSTRVM', (We have made god our helper).
26mm, 2.99g. GVF - Good Very Fine, Philip's shoulder a little weak, attractively patinated

This coin is a very good specimen as both portraits of Philip and Mary are well struck up although Philip's shoulder and beard could be a little stronger. Also all the peripheral legend on each side is generally clear and legible – again difficult to find and with the fact that this piece has seen little wear and is also very attractively patinated makes this example very desirable. When Queen Mary married Philip II of Spain as consort he became king which meant technically he ruled England as the senior Royal (as a man). For nearly four years Philip was not only king of Spain and Naples but also king of England and with Mary he tried to bring the kingdom back into the Catholic fold - from which Mary's father, Henry VIII had 'wrenched' it. Struck for only two years this coin is not only rare but a tremendously interesting token of the religious struggle which was going on at this time.

Isle of Man, Silver Crown of 1811 - issued by the Douglas Bank. Excessively rare!

Stock code: CM000955
£11,250
Country: Isle of Man
King (reign): Dove & Co. Bank, Douglas
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: 1811
Type Bank token
Ref. no: D 1; Prid 46; Q 68

Obv. View of Peel castle over the bay from the quayside. Rev. Name of issuer, denomination and date.
35mm, 15.42g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, bright with brilliant proof-like surfaces.

Excessively rare piece – only known from three or four specimens (one which belonged to Sir George Chetwynd which was auctioned in 1872 by Christies which Davis valued in 1904 as “no exaggeration thirty guineas” !). Probably struck for the partners of the bank when the copper token series was minted in 1811 – possibly as a prospective pattern for further bank issue. The bank was founded on the 27th. November 1811 and was initially situated in Fort Street in Douglas and then for the rest of its existence in Duke street. The partners were William Scarlett Littler, the Rev Robert Littler and James Dove. Some £20 worth of copper and silver tokens were prepared for use but after only three or four weeks some difference regarding policy arose between the partners resulting in James Dove suing Robert Littler who was arrested while trying to leave the island. This arrest was waived on the 3rd. of January 1812 but the banking business ceased to operate after only just over a month's operation!

Scotland, James VI silver 'Balance' Half-Merk of 1591.

Stock code: CM001070
£1,000
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): James VI (1567 - 1625)
Denomination/metal: Silver Merk, Half
Date/mint mark: 1591
Type Sixth Coinage.
Ref. no: S 5491.

Obv. Crowned shield between two thistles, 'IACOBVS 6 D G R SCOT0RVM'. Rev. Pair of scales with sword behind, 'HIS DIFFERT REGE TYRANNVS', (In these a tyrant differs from a king).
30mm, 4.42g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck and nicely toned.

Well struck and attractively patinated. The coin was worth six shillings and eight pence Scots – the coins of James VI's reign are considered to have the most beautiful designs and most varied legends of all Scottish coins. After the Union of the Crowns of 1603, Scottish gold and silver coins closely resembled their English counterparts.